“Scenes of death and destruction and the smell of blood are everywhere in Gaza’s streets, and the Israeli shelling is still ongoing. There is no celebration for us this year.”
— Hossam al-Ranteesi, a 32-year-old cab driver, on the empty streets of Gaza on Eid al-Fitr.

Resistance is justified when Gaza is occupied
July 29, 2014

As the world reels in horror at mounting Palestinian deaths in Gaza, the Israeli propaganda machine and its willing accomplices in the U.S. mainstream media have issued their customary reply: Blame Hamas.

Speaking with CNN’s Wolf Blitzer,Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu placed all responsibility for Palestinian deaths on Hamas:

We’re sad for every civilian casualty. They’re not intended. This is the difference between us. The Hamas deliberately targets civilians and deliberately hides behind civilians. They embed their rocketeers, their rocket caches, their other weaponry which they use to fire on us in civilian areas.

What choice do we have? We have to protect ourselves. So we try to target the rocketeers. We do. And all civilian casualties are unintended by us, but intended by Hamas. They want to pile up as many civilian dead as they can…They use telegenically dead Palestinians for their cause.

Netanyahu presents Israel as innocently defending itself—and Hamas as inviting Palestinian deaths for propaganda purposes. He then goes on to call Hamas “genocidal terrorists,” stating that they “call for the destruction of Israel, and they call for the killing of every Jew wherever they can find them.”

Thane Rosenbaum, a senior fellow at NYU School of Law, went even further in his July 21 Wall Street Journal op-ed article. Rosenbaum explained that it’s impossible to kill “innocent civilians” in Gaza…because all of Gaza is guilty:

[In 2006], the people of Gaza overwhelmingly elected Hamas, a terrorist outfit dedicated to the destruction of Israel, as their designated representatives…Surely they must have understood on election night that their lives would now be suspended in a state of utter chaos. Life expectancy would be miserably low; children would be without a future. Staying alive would be a challenge, if staying alive even mattered anymore…

On some basic level, you forfeit your right to be called civilians when you freely elect members of a terrorist organization as statesmen, invite them to dinner with blood on their hands and allow them to set up shop in your living room as their base of operations. At that point, you begin to look a lot more like conscripted soldiers than innocent civilians. And you have wittingly made yourself targets.

This reasoning isn’t confined to avowedly conservative publications like the Journal. Bob Dreyfuss, writing for The Nation, made the liberal version of the argument in an article titled “The Palestinians Must Put an End to Suicidal Hamas.” He directs his outrage not at Israel for its genocidal actions, but at Hamas’ “idiotic decision to fight Israel by firing useless missiles against unseen Israeli targets.”

Those who stand for self-determination for the Palestinian people shouldn’t help Israel make its case for shedding Palestinian blood. We should be challenging Israel’s various alibis for its killing fields in Gaza—and that means setting the record straight about Hamas.

Israel claims that if only Hamas were to stop firing rockets, accept a ceasefire and recognize Israel, it would stop bombing Gaza.

But Hamas did precisely that in the year and a half following the November 2012 ceasefire that ended Operation Pillar of Cloud, as Israel dubbed its last rampage through Gaza. In 2013, “Israel had one of the quietest years, if not the quietest year, it had had since rockets started coming from Gaza, which, by the way, began before the Israeli withdrawal from Gaza in the fall of 2005,” Nathan Thrall, a senior analyst at the International Crisis Group, told Democracy Now!

Between November 2012 and today, it was Israel, not Hamas, that more frequently—and far more lethally—violated the terms of the ceasefire, as an infographic at ElectronicIntifada.net shows. During this time, Israel continued to carry out air strikes against whatever targets it deemed legitimate, and Israeli snipers fired on—and killed—farmers if they strayed too close to the Israeli-designated “buffer zone” along the Gaza-Israel border. The terms of the ceasefire also stipulated that Israel would lift its blockade of Gaza—which instead intensified, especially after the Egyptian military took over power after toppling Muslim Brotherhood President Mohamed Morsi a year ago.

So why don’t the Palestinians employ nonviolent resistance, as so many liberal commentators implore?

The answer is that they do—but Israel, the media and the rest of the world routinely ignore these popular struggles. As Patrick O’Connor explained at ElectronicIntifada.net:

The fact that thousands of Palestinians and hundreds of Israelis are together employing nonviolent tactics similar to those of the U.S. civil rights movement and the South African anti-apartheid movement would come as surprising and welcome news to most Americans. Americans are largely unaware of the struggling but vibrant grassroots nonviolent movement in Palestine, because the U.S. corporate media prefers a simple, flawed story of Palestinian terrorist attacks and Israeli retaliation.

Similarly to U.S. civil rights activists, Palestinians must face tear gas, stun grenades and even live ammunition to take part in such resistance, but still they courageously do.

The nonviolent movement is based in the West Bank because that’s where it’s possible to employ such tactics in confrontations with Israeli security forces. In Gaza, which is hermetically sealed off from the rest of the world by Israel’s total control over all air and sea access—and by Egypt’s collaboration with Israel to keep Gaza’s borders closed—there is no way to engage Israel by nonviolent means. Gaza is an open-air prison, and getting too close to the bars means death by an unseen sniper, a navy boat or a drone.

Full article

heterogeneoushomosexual:

burymyart:

Indigenous Feminism Without Apology
by Andrea Smith

We often hear the mantra in indigenous communities that Native women aren’t feminists. Supposedly, feminism is not needed because Native women were treated with respect prior to colonization. Thus, any Native woman who calls herself a feminist is often condemned as being “white.”

However, when I started interviewing Native women organizers as part of a research project, I was surprised by how many community-based activists were describing themselves as “feminists without apology.” They were arguing that feminism is actually an indigenous concept that has been co-opted by white women.

The fact that Native societies were egalitarian 500 years ago is not stopping women from being hit or abused now. For instance, in my years of anti-violence organizing, I would hear, “We can’t worry about domestic violence; we must worry about survival issues first.” But since Native women are the women most likely to be killed by domestic violence, they are clearly not surviving. So when we talk about survival of our nations, who are we including?

These Native feminists are challenging not only patriarchy within Native communities, but also white supremacy and colonialism within mainstream white feminism. That is, they’re challenging why it is that white women get to define what feminism is.

DECENTERING WHITE FEMINISM

The feminist movement is generally periodized into the so-called first, second and third waves of feminism. In the United States, the first wave is characterized by the suffragette movement; the second wave is characterized by the formation of the National Organization for Women, abortion rights politics, and the fight for the Equal Rights Amendments. Suddenly, during the third wave of feminism, women of colour make an appearance to transform feminism into a multicultural movement.

This periodization situates white middle-class women as the central historical agents to which women of colour attach themselves. However, if we were to recognize the agency of indigenous women in an account of feminist history, we might begin with 1492 when Native women collectively resisted colonization. This would allow us to see that there are multiple feminist histories emerging from multiple communities of colour which intersect at points and diverge in others. This would not negate the contributions made by white feminists, but would de-center them from our historicizing and analysis.

Indigenous feminism thus centers anti-colonial practice within its organizing. This is critical today when you have mainstream feminist groups supporting, for example, the US bombing of Afghanistan with the claim that this bombing will free women from the Taliban (apparently bombing women somehow liberates them).

CHALLENGING THE STATE

Indigenous feminists are also challenging how we conceptualize indigenous sovereignty - it is not an add-on to the heteronormative and patriarchal nationstate. Rather it challenges the nationstate system itself. Charles Colson, prominent Christian Right activist and founder of Prison Fellowship, explains quite clearly the relationship between heteronormativity and the nation-state. In his view, samesex marriage leads directly to terrorism; the attack on the “natural moral order” of the heterosexual family “is like handing moral weapons of mass destruction to those who use America’s decadence to recruit more snipers and hijackers and suicide bombers.”

Similarly, the Christian Right World magazine opined that feminism contributed to the Abu Ghraib scandal by promoting women in the military. When women do not know their assigned role in the gender hierarchy, they become disoriented and abuse prisoners.

Implicit in this is analysis the understanding that heteropatriarchy is essential for the building of US empire. Patriarchy is the logic that naturalizes social hierarchy. Just as men are supposed to naturally dominate women on the basis of biology, so too should the social elites of a society naturally rule everyone else through a nation-state form of governance that is constructed through domination, violence, and control.

As Ann Burlein argues in Lift High the Cross, it may be a mistake to argue that the goal of Christian Right politics is to create a theocracy in the US. Rather, Christian Right politics work through the private family (which is coded as white, patriarchal, and middle-class) to create a “Christian America.” She notes that the investment in the private family makes it difficult for people to invest in more public forms of social connection.

For example, more investment in the suburban private family means less funding for urban areas and Native reservations. The resulting social decay is then construed to be caused by deviance from the Christian family ideal rather than political and economic forces. As former head of the Christian Coalition Ralph Reed states: “The only true solution to crime is to restore the family,” and “Family break-up causes poverty.”

Unfortunately, as Navajo feminist scholar Jennifer Denetdale points out, the Native response to a heteronormative white, Christian America has often been an equally heteronormative Native nationalism. In her critique of the Navajo tribal council’s passage of a ban on same-sex marriage, Denetdale argues that Native nations are furthering a Christian Right agenda in the name of “Indian tradition.”

This trend is equally apparent within racial justice struggles in other communities of colour. As Cathy Cohen contends, heteronormative sovereignty or racial justice struggles will effectively maintain rather than challenge colonialism and white supremacy because they are premised on a politics of secondary marginalization. The most elite class will further their aspirations on the backs of those most marginalized within the community.

Through this process of secondary marginalization, the national or racial justice struggle either implicitly or explicitly takes on a nation-state model as the end point of its struggle - a model in which the elites govern the rest through violence and domination, and exclude those who are not members of “the nation.”

NATIONAL LIBERATION

Grassroots Native women, along with Native scholars such as Taiaiake Alfred and Craig Womack, are developing other models of nationhood. These articulations counter the frequent accusations that nation-building projects necessarily lead to a narrow identity politics based on ethnic cleansing and intolerance. This requires that a clear distinction be drawn between the project of national liberation, and that of nation-state building.

Progressive activists and scholars, while prepared to make critiques of the US and Canadian governments, are often not prepared to question their legitimacy. A case in point is the strategy of many racial justice organizations in the US or Canada, who have rallied against the increase in hate crimes since 9/11 under the banner, “We’re American [or Canadian] too.”

This allegiance to “America” or “Canada” legitimizes the genocide and colonization of Native peoples upon which these nation-states are founded. By making anti-colonial struggle central to feminist politics, Native women place in question the appropriate form of governance for the world in general. In questioning the nation-state, we can begin to imagine a world that we would actually want to live in. Such a political project is particularly important for colonized peoples seeking national liberation outside the nation-state.

Whereas nation-states are governed through domination and coercion, indigenous sovereignty and nationhood is predicated on interrelatedness and responsibility.

As Sharon Venne explains, “Our spirituality and our responsibilities define our duties. We understand the concept of sovereignty as woven through a fabric that encompasses our spirituality and responsibility. This is a cyclical view of sovereignty, incorporating it into our traditional philosophy and view of our responsibilities. It differs greatly from the concept of Western sovereignty which is based upon absolute power. For us absolute power is in the Creator and the natural order of all living things; not only in human beings… Our sovereignty is related to our connections to the earth and is inherent.”

REVOLUTION

A Native feminist politics seeks to do more than simply elevate Native women’s status - it seeks to transform the world through indigenous forms of governance that can be beneficial to everyone.

At the 2005 World Liberation Theology Forum held in Porto Alegre, Brazil, indigenous peoples from Bolivia stated that they know another world is possible because they see that world whenever they do their ceremonies. Native ceremonies can be a place where the present, past and future become copresent. This is what Native Hawaiian scholar Manu Meyer calls a racial remembering of the future.

Prior to colonization, Native communities were not structured on the basis of hierarchy, oppression or patriarchy. We will not recreate these communities as they existed prior to colonization. Our understanding that a society without structures of oppression was possible in the past tells us that our current political and economic system is anything but natural and inevitable. If we lived differently before, we can live differently in the future.

Native feminism is not simply an insular or exclusivist “identity politics” as it is often accused of being. Rather, it is framework that understands indigenous women’s struggle as part of a global movement for liberation. As one activist stated: “You can’t win a revolution on your own. And we are about nothing short of a revolution. Anything else is simply not worth our time.”

Andrea Smith is Cherokee and a professor of Native American Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and co-founder of Incite! Women of Color Against Violence and the Boarding School Healing Project.

_____________________________

R.I.S.E.:
Radical
Indigenous
Survivance &
Empowerment


https://www.facebook.com/RISEIndigenous
___________________________________________.

(via randomactsofchaos)

princesswhatevr:

lilcochina:

Yet ppl don’t understand how white privilege still exists in brown n black countries

And pooooor Europe doesn’t want any immigrants in their country :’(

(via classe)

momo33me:

Ireland Palestine Solidarity Campaign demonstration, Dublin 19. July 2014
momo33me:

Ireland Palestine Solidarity Campaign demonstration, Dublin 19. July 2014
momo33me:

Ireland Palestine Solidarity Campaign demonstration, Dublin 19. July 2014
momo33me:

Ireland Palestine Solidarity Campaign demonstration, Dublin 19. July 2014
momo33me:

Ireland Palestine Solidarity Campaign demonstration, Dublin 19. July 2014
momo33me:

Ireland Palestine Solidarity Campaign demonstration, Dublin 19. July 2014

momo33me:

Ireland Palestine Solidarity Campaign demonstration, Dublin 19. July 2014

(via occupywatchdog)

thebowspring:

Native American Confronts Protesters on Illegal Immigration

badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:

standwithpalestine:

Israel’s genocide of Palestinians continues in Gaza having killed over 1,032 - including 219 children - in its latest assault and racist Israelis are out in the streets chanting “School is out in Gaza - They have no children left there”

(Starts from 0:46 - turn on English captions)

There’s no way in hell this will be shown on TV or any mainstream news website so make sure you share and reblog.

(via Elizabeth Tsurkov)

Disgusting.

Women of Comic-Con protest sexual harassment: a cute costume isn’t the same as consentJuly 27, 2014
Amid the costumes and fantasy of this weekend’s Comic-Con convention, a group of young women drew widespread attention to a very real issue — sexual harassment at the annual comic book convention.
Geeks for CONsent, founded by three women from Philadelphia, gathered nearly 2,600 signatures on an online petition supporting a formal anti-harassment policy at Comic-Con.
Conventioneers told Geeks for CONsent they’d been groped, followed and unwillingly photographed during the four-day festival.
Meanwhile, what Geeks for CONsent and others regarded as blatant objectification continued at this year’s convention. Scantily clad women were still used as decoration for some presentations, and costumed women were described as “vaguely slutty” by panel moderator Craig Ferguson. When Dwayne Johnson made a surprise appearance to promote “Hercules,” 10 women in belly-baring outfits stood silently in front of the stage for no apparent reason.
Groping, cat-calling and other forms of sexual harassment are a larger social issue, not just a Comic-Con problem. And many comics and movies still portray women as damsels in distress. But Geeks for CONsent says things are amplified at the pop-culture convention where fantasy and character costumes play such a large role.
"It’s a separate, more specific issue within the convention space," said Rochelle Keyhan, 29, director of Geeks for CONsent. "It’s very much connected (to the larger problem) and it’s the same phenomena, but manifesting a little more sexually vulgar in the comic space."
Keyhan’s focus on Comic-Con began with a movement launched in her hometown called HollabackPhilly, to help end public harassment against women and members of the LGBT community. She and her colleagues developed a comic book on the subject in hopes of engaging middle- and high-school students, which is what brought them to Comic-Con.
Costuming, or cosplay, is a big part of the popular convention, with male and female fans dressing as their favorite characters, regardless of gender. A man might wear a Wonder Woman outfit, and a woman could dress as Wolverine. Keyhan and her colleagues — all in costume — carried signs and passed out temporary tattoos during the convention that read, “Cosplay does not equal consent.”
Source
Gross sexual harassment at Comic Con. Women of Comic-Con protest sexual harassment: a cute costume isn’t the same as consentJuly 27, 2014
Amid the costumes and fantasy of this weekend’s Comic-Con convention, a group of young women drew widespread attention to a very real issue — sexual harassment at the annual comic book convention.
Geeks for CONsent, founded by three women from Philadelphia, gathered nearly 2,600 signatures on an online petition supporting a formal anti-harassment policy at Comic-Con.
Conventioneers told Geeks for CONsent they’d been groped, followed and unwillingly photographed during the four-day festival.
Meanwhile, what Geeks for CONsent and others regarded as blatant objectification continued at this year’s convention. Scantily clad women were still used as decoration for some presentations, and costumed women were described as “vaguely slutty” by panel moderator Craig Ferguson. When Dwayne Johnson made a surprise appearance to promote “Hercules,” 10 women in belly-baring outfits stood silently in front of the stage for no apparent reason.
Groping, cat-calling and other forms of sexual harassment are a larger social issue, not just a Comic-Con problem. And many comics and movies still portray women as damsels in distress. But Geeks for CONsent says things are amplified at the pop-culture convention where fantasy and character costumes play such a large role.
"It’s a separate, more specific issue within the convention space," said Rochelle Keyhan, 29, director of Geeks for CONsent. "It’s very much connected (to the larger problem) and it’s the same phenomena, but manifesting a little more sexually vulgar in the comic space."
Keyhan’s focus on Comic-Con began with a movement launched in her hometown called HollabackPhilly, to help end public harassment against women and members of the LGBT community. She and her colleagues developed a comic book on the subject in hopes of engaging middle- and high-school students, which is what brought them to Comic-Con.
Costuming, or cosplay, is a big part of the popular convention, with male and female fans dressing as their favorite characters, regardless of gender. A man might wear a Wonder Woman outfit, and a woman could dress as Wolverine. Keyhan and her colleagues — all in costume — carried signs and passed out temporary tattoos during the convention that read, “Cosplay does not equal consent.”
Source
Gross sexual harassment at Comic Con. Women of Comic-Con protest sexual harassment: a cute costume isn’t the same as consentJuly 27, 2014
Amid the costumes and fantasy of this weekend’s Comic-Con convention, a group of young women drew widespread attention to a very real issue — sexual harassment at the annual comic book convention.
Geeks for CONsent, founded by three women from Philadelphia, gathered nearly 2,600 signatures on an online petition supporting a formal anti-harassment policy at Comic-Con.
Conventioneers told Geeks for CONsent they’d been groped, followed and unwillingly photographed during the four-day festival.
Meanwhile, what Geeks for CONsent and others regarded as blatant objectification continued at this year’s convention. Scantily clad women were still used as decoration for some presentations, and costumed women were described as “vaguely slutty” by panel moderator Craig Ferguson. When Dwayne Johnson made a surprise appearance to promote “Hercules,” 10 women in belly-baring outfits stood silently in front of the stage for no apparent reason.
Groping, cat-calling and other forms of sexual harassment are a larger social issue, not just a Comic-Con problem. And many comics and movies still portray women as damsels in distress. But Geeks for CONsent says things are amplified at the pop-culture convention where fantasy and character costumes play such a large role.
"It’s a separate, more specific issue within the convention space," said Rochelle Keyhan, 29, director of Geeks for CONsent. "It’s very much connected (to the larger problem) and it’s the same phenomena, but manifesting a little more sexually vulgar in the comic space."
Keyhan’s focus on Comic-Con began with a movement launched in her hometown called HollabackPhilly, to help end public harassment against women and members of the LGBT community. She and her colleagues developed a comic book on the subject in hopes of engaging middle- and high-school students, which is what brought them to Comic-Con.
Costuming, or cosplay, is a big part of the popular convention, with male and female fans dressing as their favorite characters, regardless of gender. A man might wear a Wonder Woman outfit, and a woman could dress as Wolverine. Keyhan and her colleagues — all in costume — carried signs and passed out temporary tattoos during the convention that read, “Cosplay does not equal consent.”
Source
Gross sexual harassment at Comic Con. Women of Comic-Con protest sexual harassment: a cute costume isn’t the same as consentJuly 27, 2014
Amid the costumes and fantasy of this weekend’s Comic-Con convention, a group of young women drew widespread attention to a very real issue — sexual harassment at the annual comic book convention.
Geeks for CONsent, founded by three women from Philadelphia, gathered nearly 2,600 signatures on an online petition supporting a formal anti-harassment policy at Comic-Con.
Conventioneers told Geeks for CONsent they’d been groped, followed and unwillingly photographed during the four-day festival.
Meanwhile, what Geeks for CONsent and others regarded as blatant objectification continued at this year’s convention. Scantily clad women were still used as decoration for some presentations, and costumed women were described as “vaguely slutty” by panel moderator Craig Ferguson. When Dwayne Johnson made a surprise appearance to promote “Hercules,” 10 women in belly-baring outfits stood silently in front of the stage for no apparent reason.
Groping, cat-calling and other forms of sexual harassment are a larger social issue, not just a Comic-Con problem. And many comics and movies still portray women as damsels in distress. But Geeks for CONsent says things are amplified at the pop-culture convention where fantasy and character costumes play such a large role.
"It’s a separate, more specific issue within the convention space," said Rochelle Keyhan, 29, director of Geeks for CONsent. "It’s very much connected (to the larger problem) and it’s the same phenomena, but manifesting a little more sexually vulgar in the comic space."
Keyhan’s focus on Comic-Con began with a movement launched in her hometown called HollabackPhilly, to help end public harassment against women and members of the LGBT community. She and her colleagues developed a comic book on the subject in hopes of engaging middle- and high-school students, which is what brought them to Comic-Con.
Costuming, or cosplay, is a big part of the popular convention, with male and female fans dressing as their favorite characters, regardless of gender. A man might wear a Wonder Woman outfit, and a woman could dress as Wolverine. Keyhan and her colleagues — all in costume — carried signs and passed out temporary tattoos during the convention that read, “Cosplay does not equal consent.”
Source
Gross sexual harassment at Comic Con.

Women of Comic-Con protest sexual harassment: a cute costume isn’t the same as consent
July 27, 2014

Amid the costumes and fantasy of this weekend’s Comic-Con convention, a group of young women drew widespread attention to a very real issue — sexual harassment at the annual comic book convention.

Geeks for CONsent, founded by three women from Philadelphia, gathered nearly 2,600 signatures on an online petition supporting a formal anti-harassment policy at Comic-Con.

Conventioneers told Geeks for CONsent they’d been groped, followed and unwillingly photographed during the four-day festival.

Meanwhile, what Geeks for CONsent and others regarded as blatant objectification continued at this year’s convention. Scantily clad women were still used as decoration for some presentations, and costumed women were described as “vaguely slutty” by panel moderator Craig Ferguson. When Dwayne Johnson made a surprise appearance to promote “Hercules,” 10 women in belly-baring outfits stood silently in front of the stage for no apparent reason.

Groping, cat-calling and other forms of sexual harassment are a larger social issue, not just a Comic-Con problem. And many comics and movies still portray women as damsels in distress. But Geeks for CONsent says things are amplified at the pop-culture convention where fantasy and character costumes play such a large role.

"It’s a separate, more specific issue within the convention space," said Rochelle Keyhan, 29, director of Geeks for CONsent. "It’s very much connected (to the larger problem) and it’s the same phenomena, but manifesting a little more sexually vulgar in the comic space."

Keyhan’s focus on Comic-Con began with a movement launched in her hometown called HollabackPhilly, to help end public harassment against women and members of the LGBT community. She and her colleagues developed a comic book on the subject in hopes of engaging middle- and high-school students, which is what brought them to Comic-Con.

Costuming, or cosplay, is a big part of the popular convention, with male and female fans dressing as their favorite characters, regardless of gender. A man might wear a Wonder Woman outfit, and a woman could dress as Wolverine. Keyhan and her colleagues — all in costume — carried signs and passed out temporary tattoos during the convention that read, “Cosplay does not equal consent.”

Source

Gross sexual harassment at Comic Con.

ladyfenric:

transpridebrighton:

Our first ever Trans* Pride March, was a heart-felt success. We anticipated around 100 people for the march, and we were emotionally overwhelmed with the people who turned up, with banners, acapella songs (thanks Rainbow Chorus!), instruments playing soundscapes, friends & allies. It was extremely special and a great way to kick off our main event day, Pride in the Park at New Steine Gardens. You can read about it here in Gscene online.
Also, in the park, we are pleased to report 1923 unique visitors. Way more than we anticipated. You can read about Pride in the Park here.
Today is the last day of our three day event, with a BYO picnic & BBQ at the beach directly down from the New Steine Gardens, from 12 midday. Look for the Trans* Pride flags.
Fox & Lew will be filming for a My Genderation video to document this year’s event.
More details: FB page

It was a brilliant event, wonderful atmosphere, glorious weather (almost too good, darn was it hot), just a lot of fun and yeah…. just thanks to all the organisers and volunteers for putting on and enabling such -a wonderful event to be run.
ladyfenric:

transpridebrighton:

Our first ever Trans* Pride March, was a heart-felt success. We anticipated around 100 people for the march, and we were emotionally overwhelmed with the people who turned up, with banners, acapella songs (thanks Rainbow Chorus!), instruments playing soundscapes, friends & allies. It was extremely special and a great way to kick off our main event day, Pride in the Park at New Steine Gardens. You can read about it here in Gscene online.
Also, in the park, we are pleased to report 1923 unique visitors. Way more than we anticipated. You can read about Pride in the Park here.
Today is the last day of our three day event, with a BYO picnic & BBQ at the beach directly down from the New Steine Gardens, from 12 midday. Look for the Trans* Pride flags.
Fox & Lew will be filming for a My Genderation video to document this year’s event.
More details: FB page

It was a brilliant event, wonderful atmosphere, glorious weather (almost too good, darn was it hot), just a lot of fun and yeah…. just thanks to all the organisers and volunteers for putting on and enabling such -a wonderful event to be run.

ladyfenric:

transpridebrighton:

Our first ever Trans* Pride March, was a heart-felt success. We anticipated around 100 people for the march, and we were emotionally overwhelmed with the people who turned up, with banners, acapella songs (thanks Rainbow Chorus!), instruments playing soundscapes, friends & allies. It was extremely special and a great way to kick off our main event day, Pride in the Park at New Steine Gardens. You can read about it here in Gscene online.

Also, in the park, we are pleased to report 1923 unique visitors. Way more than we anticipated. You can read about Pride in the Park here.

Today is the last day of our three day event, with a BYO picnic & BBQ at the beach directly down from the New Steine Gardens, from 12 midday. Look for the Trans* Pride flags.

Fox & Lew will be filming for a My Genderation video to document this year’s event.

More details: FB page

It was a brilliant event, wonderful atmosphere, glorious weather (almost too good, darn was it hot), just a lot of fun and yeah…. just thanks to all the organisers and volunteers for putting on and enabling such -a wonderful event to be run.

solockedup:

thepeoplesrecord:

If you want to share these photos on Facebook, they can be found here: Arundhati Roy, Stephane Hessel, Mairead Maguire, Suzanne Weiss, Alice Walker, Russell Means, Angela Davis, Desmond Tutu, Norman Finkelstein. 
Side note: the url in many of these images is no longer functional. It is now http://thepeoplesrec.com. 

I’m still trying to figure out how these white Europeans, tortured though they may have been in their homelands, felt they could just plop themselves down on land (and in ancestral homes) where people were already living. They are worse than the colonialists that invaded America.

Mmmmm, I’d say they are on par with the colonialists that invaded America. What colonial settlers did to indigenous people in America was (is and continues to be) horrific, systematic, racist and evil. Millions of lives ended, people subjugated into extreme poverty, families torn apart, histories lost and some people completely systematically exterminated. I don’t think there’s any reason to down play that in order to recognize the terror and evil that settlers in Palestine have put the Palestinians through. -Robert solockedup:

thepeoplesrecord:

If you want to share these photos on Facebook, they can be found here: Arundhati Roy, Stephane Hessel, Mairead Maguire, Suzanne Weiss, Alice Walker, Russell Means, Angela Davis, Desmond Tutu, Norman Finkelstein. 
Side note: the url in many of these images is no longer functional. It is now http://thepeoplesrec.com. 

I’m still trying to figure out how these white Europeans, tortured though they may have been in their homelands, felt they could just plop themselves down on land (and in ancestral homes) where people were already living. They are worse than the colonialists that invaded America.

Mmmmm, I’d say they are on par with the colonialists that invaded America. What colonial settlers did to indigenous people in America was (is and continues to be) horrific, systematic, racist and evil. Millions of lives ended, people subjugated into extreme poverty, families torn apart, histories lost and some people completely systematically exterminated. I don’t think there’s any reason to down play that in order to recognize the terror and evil that settlers in Palestine have put the Palestinians through. -Robert solockedup:

thepeoplesrecord:

If you want to share these photos on Facebook, they can be found here: Arundhati Roy, Stephane Hessel, Mairead Maguire, Suzanne Weiss, Alice Walker, Russell Means, Angela Davis, Desmond Tutu, Norman Finkelstein. 
Side note: the url in many of these images is no longer functional. It is now http://thepeoplesrec.com. 

I’m still trying to figure out how these white Europeans, tortured though they may have been in their homelands, felt they could just plop themselves down on land (and in ancestral homes) where people were already living. They are worse than the colonialists that invaded America.

Mmmmm, I’d say they are on par with the colonialists that invaded America. What colonial settlers did to indigenous people in America was (is and continues to be) horrific, systematic, racist and evil. Millions of lives ended, people subjugated into extreme poverty, families torn apart, histories lost and some people completely systematically exterminated. I don’t think there’s any reason to down play that in order to recognize the terror and evil that settlers in Palestine have put the Palestinians through. -Robert solockedup:

thepeoplesrecord:

If you want to share these photos on Facebook, they can be found here: Arundhati Roy, Stephane Hessel, Mairead Maguire, Suzanne Weiss, Alice Walker, Russell Means, Angela Davis, Desmond Tutu, Norman Finkelstein. 
Side note: the url in many of these images is no longer functional. It is now http://thepeoplesrec.com. 

I’m still trying to figure out how these white Europeans, tortured though they may have been in their homelands, felt they could just plop themselves down on land (and in ancestral homes) where people were already living. They are worse than the colonialists that invaded America.

Mmmmm, I’d say they are on par with the colonialists that invaded America. What colonial settlers did to indigenous people in America was (is and continues to be) horrific, systematic, racist and evil. Millions of lives ended, people subjugated into extreme poverty, families torn apart, histories lost and some people completely systematically exterminated. I don’t think there’s any reason to down play that in order to recognize the terror and evil that settlers in Palestine have put the Palestinians through. -Robert solockedup:

thepeoplesrecord:

If you want to share these photos on Facebook, they can be found here: Arundhati Roy, Stephane Hessel, Mairead Maguire, Suzanne Weiss, Alice Walker, Russell Means, Angela Davis, Desmond Tutu, Norman Finkelstein. 
Side note: the url in many of these images is no longer functional. It is now http://thepeoplesrec.com. 

I’m still trying to figure out how these white Europeans, tortured though they may have been in their homelands, felt they could just plop themselves down on land (and in ancestral homes) where people were already living. They are worse than the colonialists that invaded America.

Mmmmm, I’d say they are on par with the colonialists that invaded America. What colonial settlers did to indigenous people in America was (is and continues to be) horrific, systematic, racist and evil. Millions of lives ended, people subjugated into extreme poverty, families torn apart, histories lost and some people completely systematically exterminated. I don’t think there’s any reason to down play that in order to recognize the terror and evil that settlers in Palestine have put the Palestinians through. -Robert solockedup:

thepeoplesrecord:

If you want to share these photos on Facebook, they can be found here: Arundhati Roy, Stephane Hessel, Mairead Maguire, Suzanne Weiss, Alice Walker, Russell Means, Angela Davis, Desmond Tutu, Norman Finkelstein. 
Side note: the url in many of these images is no longer functional. It is now http://thepeoplesrec.com. 

I’m still trying to figure out how these white Europeans, tortured though they may have been in their homelands, felt they could just plop themselves down on land (and in ancestral homes) where people were already living. They are worse than the colonialists that invaded America.

Mmmmm, I’d say they are on par with the colonialists that invaded America. What colonial settlers did to indigenous people in America was (is and continues to be) horrific, systematic, racist and evil. Millions of lives ended, people subjugated into extreme poverty, families torn apart, histories lost and some people completely systematically exterminated. I don’t think there’s any reason to down play that in order to recognize the terror and evil that settlers in Palestine have put the Palestinians through. -Robert solockedup:

thepeoplesrecord:

If you want to share these photos on Facebook, they can be found here: Arundhati Roy, Stephane Hessel, Mairead Maguire, Suzanne Weiss, Alice Walker, Russell Means, Angela Davis, Desmond Tutu, Norman Finkelstein. 
Side note: the url in many of these images is no longer functional. It is now http://thepeoplesrec.com. 

I’m still trying to figure out how these white Europeans, tortured though they may have been in their homelands, felt they could just plop themselves down on land (and in ancestral homes) where people were already living. They are worse than the colonialists that invaded America.

Mmmmm, I’d say they are on par with the colonialists that invaded America. What colonial settlers did to indigenous people in America was (is and continues to be) horrific, systematic, racist and evil. Millions of lives ended, people subjugated into extreme poverty, families torn apart, histories lost and some people completely systematically exterminated. I don’t think there’s any reason to down play that in order to recognize the terror and evil that settlers in Palestine have put the Palestinians through. -Robert solockedup:

thepeoplesrecord:

If you want to share these photos on Facebook, they can be found here: Arundhati Roy, Stephane Hessel, Mairead Maguire, Suzanne Weiss, Alice Walker, Russell Means, Angela Davis, Desmond Tutu, Norman Finkelstein. 
Side note: the url in many of these images is no longer functional. It is now http://thepeoplesrec.com. 

I’m still trying to figure out how these white Europeans, tortured though they may have been in their homelands, felt they could just plop themselves down on land (and in ancestral homes) where people were already living. They are worse than the colonialists that invaded America.

Mmmmm, I’d say they are on par with the colonialists that invaded America. What colonial settlers did to indigenous people in America was (is and continues to be) horrific, systematic, racist and evil. Millions of lives ended, people subjugated into extreme poverty, families torn apart, histories lost and some people completely systematically exterminated. I don’t think there’s any reason to down play that in order to recognize the terror and evil that settlers in Palestine have put the Palestinians through. -Robert solockedup:

thepeoplesrecord:

If you want to share these photos on Facebook, they can be found here: Arundhati Roy, Stephane Hessel, Mairead Maguire, Suzanne Weiss, Alice Walker, Russell Means, Angela Davis, Desmond Tutu, Norman Finkelstein. 
Side note: the url in many of these images is no longer functional. It is now http://thepeoplesrec.com. 

I’m still trying to figure out how these white Europeans, tortured though they may have been in their homelands, felt they could just plop themselves down on land (and in ancestral homes) where people were already living. They are worse than the colonialists that invaded America.

Mmmmm, I’d say they are on par with the colonialists that invaded America. What colonial settlers did to indigenous people in America was (is and continues to be) horrific, systematic, racist and evil. Millions of lives ended, people subjugated into extreme poverty, families torn apart, histories lost and some people completely systematically exterminated. I don’t think there’s any reason to down play that in order to recognize the terror and evil that settlers in Palestine have put the Palestinians through. -Robert

solockedup:

thepeoplesrecord:

If you want to share these photos on Facebook, they can be found here: Arundhati Roy, Stephane Hessel, Mairead MaguireSuzanne Weiss, Alice Walker, Russell Means, Angela Davis, Desmond Tutu, Norman Finkelstein

Side note: the url in many of these images is no longer functional. It is now http://thepeoplesrec.com

I’m still trying to figure out how these white Europeans, tortured though they may have been in their homelands, felt they could just plop themselves down on land (and in ancestral homes) where people were already living. They are worse than the colonialists that invaded America.

Mmmmm, I’d say they are on par with the colonialists that invaded America. What colonial settlers did to indigenous people in America was (is and continues to be) horrific, systematic, racist and evil. Millions of lives ended, people subjugated into extreme poverty, families torn apart, histories lost and some people completely systematically exterminated. I don’t think there’s any reason to down play that in order to recognize the terror and evil that settlers in Palestine have put the Palestinians through. -Robert

remikanazi:

Palestinians don’t have to pay people to tweet. Millions around the world are naturally outraged. (Photo via @GazaYBO on Twitter

anarcho-queer:

NYPD Officer Draws Gun And Stomps On Man’s Head In Bed Stuy

The NYPD placed a Bed-Stuy police officer on modified duty Friday after a video surfaced showing him stepping on a man’s head and pointing a gun at his face while placing him under arrest, officials and police sources said.

The video shows two officers from the 81st Precinct subduing a man identified by activists as Jahmil-El Cuffee, 32, in the driveway of a Bed-Stuy home before taking him to the ground while he appears to be resisting arrest. The officers arrested him for smoking a joint, police sources said.

While his partner continues to subdue Cuffee, the video shows the unidentified officer pull out what appears to be a firearm, briefly pointing it at the man’s face before then putting it away as onlookers yelled at the two policemen.

The same officer then walks away from the situation before returning, lifting his leg and stepping down in the vicinity of Cuffee’s head as another officer walks in front of the camera amidst screams from onlookers.

Later, the man recording the video says, “I just watched them stomp on that man’s head. And you had him on the floor already.

The arrest comes amid growing criticism of the NYPD stemming from the death of Eric Garner, a Staten Island man who died after being wrestled to the ground and put into what appeared to be a chokehold. That incident was also recorded on cellphone video.

Another video surfaced days later showing an officer using a chokehold on a man and punching him in an East Harlem subway station. That officer remains on active duty, police said.

Source

Thanks to Stoneyg Loc for taking this video and making sure the cops knew they were on camera. The officer was ready to kill a man for smoking a joint. A tragedy was avoided because he had the courage to record the cops and hold them accountable for their use of excessive force. 

I live in Bed-Stuy & there are cops everywhere all the time, including two watch towers. 

Record cops with NYCLU’s Stop & Frisk app

It has three primary functions:

  • RECORD: This allows the user to film an incident with audio by simply pushing a trigger on the phone’s frame. Shaking the phone stops the filming. When filming stops, the user immediately receives a brief survey allowing them to provide details about the incident. The video and survey will go to the NYCLU, which will use the information to shed light on the NYPD’s stop-and-frisk practices and hold the Department accountable for its actions.
  • LISTEN: This function alerts the user when people in their vicinity are being stopped by the police. When other app users in the area trigger Stop and Frisk Watch, the user receives a message reporting where the police stop is happening. This feature is especially useful for community groups who monitor police activity.
  • REPORT: This prompts the survey, allowing users to report a police interaction they saw or experienced, even if they didn’t film it.

(via aboriginalnewswire)

fuckyeahlgbtqartists:


TransCuba: Photographer Mariette Pathy Allen Explores a Hidden Havana Subculture



For more than 30 years, New York based photographer and painter Mariette Pathy Allenhas been documenting transgender culture worldwide; in 2004 she won the Lambda Literary Award for her monograph The Gender Frontier. In her new publication, TransCuba, Allen focuses on the transgender community of Cuba, especially its growing visibility and acceptance in a country whose government is transitioning into a more relaxed model of communism under Raúl Castro’s presidency.
 
An excerpt from Mariela Castro Espin, who is the director of the Cuban National Center for Sex Education in Havana, is included in the book: “We dedicate this day to families because we want families to be conscious of their great social responsibility, so that all of our families, all of the people with the great social responsibility of being a parent, realize that their can’t be any form of discrimination in the family, discrimination based in the prejudice that we’ve inherited from dominant societies.”
(source)



fuckyeahlgbtqartists:


TransCuba: Photographer Mariette Pathy Allen Explores a Hidden Havana Subculture



For more than 30 years, New York based photographer and painter Mariette Pathy Allenhas been documenting transgender culture worldwide; in 2004 she won the Lambda Literary Award for her monograph The Gender Frontier. In her new publication, TransCuba, Allen focuses on the transgender community of Cuba, especially its growing visibility and acceptance in a country whose government is transitioning into a more relaxed model of communism under Raúl Castro’s presidency.
 
An excerpt from Mariela Castro Espin, who is the director of the Cuban National Center for Sex Education in Havana, is included in the book: “We dedicate this day to families because we want families to be conscious of their great social responsibility, so that all of our families, all of the people with the great social responsibility of being a parent, realize that their can’t be any form of discrimination in the family, discrimination based in the prejudice that we’ve inherited from dominant societies.”
(source)



fuckyeahlgbtqartists:


TransCuba: Photographer Mariette Pathy Allen Explores a Hidden Havana Subculture



For more than 30 years, New York based photographer and painter Mariette Pathy Allenhas been documenting transgender culture worldwide; in 2004 she won the Lambda Literary Award for her monograph The Gender Frontier. In her new publication, TransCuba, Allen focuses on the transgender community of Cuba, especially its growing visibility and acceptance in a country whose government is transitioning into a more relaxed model of communism under Raúl Castro’s presidency.
 
An excerpt from Mariela Castro Espin, who is the director of the Cuban National Center for Sex Education in Havana, is included in the book: “We dedicate this day to families because we want families to be conscious of their great social responsibility, so that all of our families, all of the people with the great social responsibility of being a parent, realize that their can’t be any form of discrimination in the family, discrimination based in the prejudice that we’ve inherited from dominant societies.”
(source)



fuckyeahlgbtqartists:


TransCuba: Photographer Mariette Pathy Allen Explores a Hidden Havana Subculture



For more than 30 years, New York based photographer and painter Mariette Pathy Allenhas been documenting transgender culture worldwide; in 2004 she won the Lambda Literary Award for her monograph The Gender Frontier. In her new publication, TransCuba, Allen focuses on the transgender community of Cuba, especially its growing visibility and acceptance in a country whose government is transitioning into a more relaxed model of communism under Raúl Castro’s presidency.
 
An excerpt from Mariela Castro Espin, who is the director of the Cuban National Center for Sex Education in Havana, is included in the book: “We dedicate this day to families because we want families to be conscious of their great social responsibility, so that all of our families, all of the people with the great social responsibility of being a parent, realize that their can’t be any form of discrimination in the family, discrimination based in the prejudice that we’ve inherited from dominant societies.”
(source)



fuckyeahlgbtqartists:


TransCuba: Photographer Mariette Pathy Allen Explores a Hidden Havana Subculture



For more than 30 years, New York based photographer and painter Mariette Pathy Allenhas been documenting transgender culture worldwide; in 2004 she won the Lambda Literary Award for her monograph The Gender Frontier. In her new publication, TransCuba, Allen focuses on the transgender community of Cuba, especially its growing visibility and acceptance in a country whose government is transitioning into a more relaxed model of communism under Raúl Castro’s presidency.
 
An excerpt from Mariela Castro Espin, who is the director of the Cuban National Center for Sex Education in Havana, is included in the book: “We dedicate this day to families because we want families to be conscious of their great social responsibility, so that all of our families, all of the people with the great social responsibility of being a parent, realize that their can’t be any form of discrimination in the family, discrimination based in the prejudice that we’ve inherited from dominant societies.”
(source)



fuckyeahlgbtqartists:


TransCuba: Photographer Mariette Pathy Allen Explores a Hidden Havana Subculture



For more than 30 years, New York based photographer and painter Mariette Pathy Allenhas been documenting transgender culture worldwide; in 2004 she won the Lambda Literary Award for her monograph The Gender Frontier. In her new publication, TransCuba, Allen focuses on the transgender community of Cuba, especially its growing visibility and acceptance in a country whose government is transitioning into a more relaxed model of communism under Raúl Castro’s presidency.
 
An excerpt from Mariela Castro Espin, who is the director of the Cuban National Center for Sex Education in Havana, is included in the book: “We dedicate this day to families because we want families to be conscious of their great social responsibility, so that all of our families, all of the people with the great social responsibility of being a parent, realize that their can’t be any form of discrimination in the family, discrimination based in the prejudice that we’ve inherited from dominant societies.”
(source)



fuckyeahlgbtqartists:


TransCuba: Photographer Mariette Pathy Allen Explores a Hidden Havana Subculture



For more than 30 years, New York based photographer and painter Mariette Pathy Allenhas been documenting transgender culture worldwide; in 2004 she won the Lambda Literary Award for her monograph The Gender Frontier. In her new publication, TransCuba, Allen focuses on the transgender community of Cuba, especially its growing visibility and acceptance in a country whose government is transitioning into a more relaxed model of communism under Raúl Castro’s presidency.
 
An excerpt from Mariela Castro Espin, who is the director of the Cuban National Center for Sex Education in Havana, is included in the book: “We dedicate this day to families because we want families to be conscious of their great social responsibility, so that all of our families, all of the people with the great social responsibility of being a parent, realize that their can’t be any form of discrimination in the family, discrimination based in the prejudice that we’ve inherited from dominant societies.”
(source)



fuckyeahlgbtqartists:


TransCuba: Photographer Mariette Pathy Allen Explores a Hidden Havana Subculture



For more than 30 years, New York based photographer and painter Mariette Pathy Allenhas been documenting transgender culture worldwide; in 2004 she won the Lambda Literary Award for her monograph The Gender Frontier. In her new publication, TransCuba, Allen focuses on the transgender community of Cuba, especially its growing visibility and acceptance in a country whose government is transitioning into a more relaxed model of communism under Raúl Castro’s presidency.
 
An excerpt from Mariela Castro Espin, who is the director of the Cuban National Center for Sex Education in Havana, is included in the book: “We dedicate this day to families because we want families to be conscious of their great social responsibility, so that all of our families, all of the people with the great social responsibility of being a parent, realize that their can’t be any form of discrimination in the family, discrimination based in the prejudice that we’ve inherited from dominant societies.”
(source)



fuckyeahlgbtqartists:


TransCuba: Photographer Mariette Pathy Allen Explores a Hidden Havana Subculture



For more than 30 years, New York based photographer and painter Mariette Pathy Allenhas been documenting transgender culture worldwide; in 2004 she won the Lambda Literary Award for her monograph The Gender Frontier. In her new publication, TransCuba, Allen focuses on the transgender community of Cuba, especially its growing visibility and acceptance in a country whose government is transitioning into a more relaxed model of communism under Raúl Castro’s presidency.
 
An excerpt from Mariela Castro Espin, who is the director of the Cuban National Center for Sex Education in Havana, is included in the book: “We dedicate this day to families because we want families to be conscious of their great social responsibility, so that all of our families, all of the people with the great social responsibility of being a parent, realize that their can’t be any form of discrimination in the family, discrimination based in the prejudice that we’ve inherited from dominant societies.”
(source)

fuckyeahlgbtqartists:

TransCuba: Photographer Mariette Pathy Allen Explores a Hidden Havana Subculture

For more than 30 years, New York based photographer and painter Mariette Pathy Allenhas been documenting transgender culture worldwide; in 2004 she won the Lambda Literary Award for her monograph The Gender Frontier. In her new publication, TransCuba, Allen focuses on the transgender community of Cuba, especially its growing visibility and acceptance in a country whose government is transitioning into a more relaxed model of communism under Raúl Castro’s presidency.
 
An excerpt from Mariela Castro Espin, who is the director of the Cuban National Center for Sex Education in Havana, is included in the book: “We dedicate this day to families because we want families to be conscious of their great social responsibility, so that all of our families, all of the people with the great social responsibility of being a parent, realize that their can’t be any form of discrimination in the family, discrimination based in the prejudice that we’ve inherited from dominant societies.”

(via alder-knight)

The overrepresentation of Indigenous children in the child protection system is “complicated”, says the report. “The legacy of past policies of forced removal; intergenerational effects of previous separations from family and culture; lower socioeconomic status; and perceptions arising from cultural differences in child-rearing practices, are all underlying causes for their over-representation in the child welfare system,” it reads.