Dream Defenders release national demands for #Handsup Don’t Shoot Movement
August 23, 2014

Dream Defenders, the youth group most famous for occupying Florida Governor Rick Scott’s office to protest Stand Your Ground laws, has started what it describes as a movement to fight police brutality after the killing of Michael Brown. According to a new video, the group is encouraging young people to gather at the offices of their local U.S. attorneys to demand the end to police violence against unarmed civilians. In the name of Israel Hernandez-Llach, a Colombia-born artist killed by a police officer’s stun gun, Dream Defenders staged such an action at the U.S. attorney’s office in downtown Miami on August 18. In the video the group encourages activists to make local demands. And among six national demands, Dream Defenders are pushing for front-facing cameras for officers who work in departments with a history of racist policing, and the demilitarization of police.

For more, watch the video.

Source

haneefistheonlyone:

ricflairsniece:

vandal—savage:

rebelbaes:

vandal—savage:

takeprideinyourheritage:

jamelrealness:

deviatedanddope:

I need the source but I wouldn’t hold it past them…corrupt ass pigs.

These cops are sick

i heard about this story too.

And yet no source.

bruh I read the story in the paper a few months back. i remember this. chill on the condescending attitude. 

All I asked was a source on the story not just words on a photo. How is that condescending?

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/cops-break-kid-leg-sexually-abuse-mom-article-1.1602489

Jesus Christ

(via amerykah)

Ferguson officer relieved of duty after ‘black little perverts’ video surfacesAugust 23, 2014
A police officer involved in the protests over Michael Brown’s death in Ferguson, Missouri, has been relieved of his duty after video surfaced of him describing black people as “little perverts” and Barack Obama as an illegal immigrant.
Dan Page – who was seen live on CNN earlier this week threatening to arrest the network’s anchor Don Lemon – was recorded in April giving a speech in which he railed against Muslims and gay people, saying: “I’m into diversity – I kill everybody.”
Page is the second St Louis county officer to have been stood down in controversial circumstances surrounding the Ferguson protests. Lieutenant Ray Albers was suspended on Wednesday after video emerged of him pointing his assault weapon at protestors and threatening to kill them.
In his speech, Page, who claims to have been a sergeant major in the US army and a Vietnam war veteran, sharply criticized laws intended to protect minorities from racially-motivated hatred and to help increase ethnic diversity.
Citing the US declaration of independence’s statement that “all men are created equal,” he said: “That does not mean affirmative action. It means we’re all equal … God does not respect persons so we have no business passing hate crime laws.”
“This here”, he added, brandishing a copy of the Bible, “is the foundation for this”, meaning the declaration of independence. “You can’t separate them. I don’t know what them black little perverts don’t understand down there.”
Page made his remarks during an address earlier this year to a St Louis branch of the Oathkeepers, an association of former and serving military personnel, police officers and first responders. The group says that its members “pledge to fulfill the oath all military and police take to ‘defend the constitution against all enemies, foreign and domestic’.”
At one point during a slideshow of his past travels, Page displayed a photograph of himself in Kenya. “I said I wanna go find where that illegal alien claiming to be my president, my undocumented president, lives at.” He has previously said in interviews that he retired from the army because of Obama.
Page also told the audience in his speech: “If you take a stand against sodomy or abortion you’re a terrorist, ladies and gentlemen … In the military right now we have open sodomy, people holding hands, people swapping spit together. Sick. It’s pitiful.”
Later in his remarks, Page told a questioner in the audience: “Policemen are very cynical. I know I am. I don’t trust anybody. I hate everybody. I hate y’all, too. I hate everybody. I’m into diversity – I kill everybody. I don’t care.”

Source

Ferguson officer relieved of duty after ‘black little perverts’ video surfaces
August 23, 2014

A police officer involved in the protests over Michael Brown’s death in Ferguson, Missouri, has been relieved of his duty after video surfaced of him describing black people as “little perverts” and Barack Obama as an illegal immigrant.

Dan Page – who was seen live on CNN earlier this week threatening to arrest the network’s anchor Don Lemon – was recorded in April giving a speech in which he railed against Muslims and gay people, saying: “I’m into diversity – I kill everybody.”

Page is the second St Louis county officer to have been stood down in controversial circumstances surrounding the Ferguson protests. Lieutenant Ray Albers was suspended on Wednesday after video emerged of him pointing his assault weapon at protestors and threatening to kill them.

In his speech, Page, who claims to have been a sergeant major in the US army and a Vietnam war veteran, sharply criticized laws intended to protect minorities from racially-motivated hatred and to help increase ethnic diversity.

Citing the US declaration of independence’s statement that “all men are created equal,” he said: “That does not mean affirmative action. It means we’re all equal … God does not respect persons so we have no business passing hate crime laws.”

“This here”, he added, brandishing a copy of the Bible, “is the foundation for this”, meaning the declaration of independence. “You can’t separate them. I don’t know what them black little perverts don’t understand down there.

Page made his remarks during an address earlier this year to a St Louis branch of the Oathkeepers, an association of former and serving military personnel, police officers and first responders. The group says that its members “pledge to fulfill the oath all military and police take to ‘defend the constitution against all enemies, foreign and domestic’.”

At one point during a slideshow of his past travels, Page displayed a photograph of himself in Kenya. “I said I wanna go find where that illegal alien claiming to be my president, my undocumented president, lives at.” He has previously said in interviews that he retired from the army because of Obama.

Page also told the audience in his speech: “If you take a stand against sodomy or abortion you’re a terrorist, ladies and gentlemen … In the military right now we have open sodomy, people holding hands, people swapping spit together. Sick. It’s pitiful.”

Later in his remarks, Page told a questioner in the audience: “Policemen are very cynical. I know I am. I don’t trust anybody. I hate everybody. I hate y’all, too. I hate everybody. I’m into diversity – I kill everybody. I don’t care.”

Source

“Colorful demonstrations and weekend marches are vital but alone are not powerful enough to stop wars. Wars will be stopped only when soldiers refuse to fight, when workers refuse to load weapons onto ships and aircraft, when people boycott the economic outposts of Empire that are strung across the globe.”
— Arundhati Roy, Public Power in the Age of Empire (via sonofbaldwin)
NYPD cops beat man during solidarity protest for Michael Brown in East Village; videoAugust 21, 2014
NYPD cops beat a man Wednesday night during a solidarity protest for Michael Brown, a video shows, although the circumstances surrounding the attack remained unclear early Thursday.
The 45-second video begins after police officers and the man have started arguing in the middle of a dark street in the East Village. It was not apparent what prompted officers to react so forcefully.
When asked for a comment on the video, police said the man was taken into custody on E. 10th St. near Ave. D, issued a C-summons for disorderly conduct and then released. They described his actions before the violent encounter as “tumultuous behavior.”
Demonstrators marched through the Lower East Side and in Union Square over the death of Brown, the unarmed black teen gunned down by a white cop in Ferguson, Mo., on Aug. 9. Brown’s killing followed the July 17 death of Eric Garner, 43, who was put in a chokehold by cops in Staten Island.
The Wednesday night video, taken from a BlackBerry and posted on Facebook, shows officers punching and tackling a man to the ground while protesters stand around shouting at the cops.
"Don’t shoot him! Don’t shoot him!" one woman yells as the melee begins.
"Yo, you knocked him out," another man shouts as a swarm of officers arrive at the scene.
A crowd of protesters surrounded the officers chanting “Hands up, don’t shoot,” which has become the motto for Brown protests around the country.
The clip ends with a group yelling, “Cops, pigs, murders,” at the responding officers.

Source NYPD cops beat man during solidarity protest for Michael Brown in East Village; videoAugust 21, 2014
NYPD cops beat a man Wednesday night during a solidarity protest for Michael Brown, a video shows, although the circumstances surrounding the attack remained unclear early Thursday.
The 45-second video begins after police officers and the man have started arguing in the middle of a dark street in the East Village. It was not apparent what prompted officers to react so forcefully.
When asked for a comment on the video, police said the man was taken into custody on E. 10th St. near Ave. D, issued a C-summons for disorderly conduct and then released. They described his actions before the violent encounter as “tumultuous behavior.”
Demonstrators marched through the Lower East Side and in Union Square over the death of Brown, the unarmed black teen gunned down by a white cop in Ferguson, Mo., on Aug. 9. Brown’s killing followed the July 17 death of Eric Garner, 43, who was put in a chokehold by cops in Staten Island.
The Wednesday night video, taken from a BlackBerry and posted on Facebook, shows officers punching and tackling a man to the ground while protesters stand around shouting at the cops.
"Don’t shoot him! Don’t shoot him!" one woman yells as the melee begins.
"Yo, you knocked him out," another man shouts as a swarm of officers arrive at the scene.
A crowd of protesters surrounded the officers chanting “Hands up, don’t shoot,” which has become the motto for Brown protests around the country.
The clip ends with a group yelling, “Cops, pigs, murders,” at the responding officers.

Source NYPD cops beat man during solidarity protest for Michael Brown in East Village; videoAugust 21, 2014
NYPD cops beat a man Wednesday night during a solidarity protest for Michael Brown, a video shows, although the circumstances surrounding the attack remained unclear early Thursday.
The 45-second video begins after police officers and the man have started arguing in the middle of a dark street in the East Village. It was not apparent what prompted officers to react so forcefully.
When asked for a comment on the video, police said the man was taken into custody on E. 10th St. near Ave. D, issued a C-summons for disorderly conduct and then released. They described his actions before the violent encounter as “tumultuous behavior.”
Demonstrators marched through the Lower East Side and in Union Square over the death of Brown, the unarmed black teen gunned down by a white cop in Ferguson, Mo., on Aug. 9. Brown’s killing followed the July 17 death of Eric Garner, 43, who was put in a chokehold by cops in Staten Island.
The Wednesday night video, taken from a BlackBerry and posted on Facebook, shows officers punching and tackling a man to the ground while protesters stand around shouting at the cops.
"Don’t shoot him! Don’t shoot him!" one woman yells as the melee begins.
"Yo, you knocked him out," another man shouts as a swarm of officers arrive at the scene.
A crowd of protesters surrounded the officers chanting “Hands up, don’t shoot,” which has become the motto for Brown protests around the country.
The clip ends with a group yelling, “Cops, pigs, murders,” at the responding officers.

Source NYPD cops beat man during solidarity protest for Michael Brown in East Village; videoAugust 21, 2014
NYPD cops beat a man Wednesday night during a solidarity protest for Michael Brown, a video shows, although the circumstances surrounding the attack remained unclear early Thursday.
The 45-second video begins after police officers and the man have started arguing in the middle of a dark street in the East Village. It was not apparent what prompted officers to react so forcefully.
When asked for a comment on the video, police said the man was taken into custody on E. 10th St. near Ave. D, issued a C-summons for disorderly conduct and then released. They described his actions before the violent encounter as “tumultuous behavior.”
Demonstrators marched through the Lower East Side and in Union Square over the death of Brown, the unarmed black teen gunned down by a white cop in Ferguson, Mo., on Aug. 9. Brown’s killing followed the July 17 death of Eric Garner, 43, who was put in a chokehold by cops in Staten Island.
The Wednesday night video, taken from a BlackBerry and posted on Facebook, shows officers punching and tackling a man to the ground while protesters stand around shouting at the cops.
"Don’t shoot him! Don’t shoot him!" one woman yells as the melee begins.
"Yo, you knocked him out," another man shouts as a swarm of officers arrive at the scene.
A crowd of protesters surrounded the officers chanting “Hands up, don’t shoot,” which has become the motto for Brown protests around the country.
The clip ends with a group yelling, “Cops, pigs, murders,” at the responding officers.

Source NYPD cops beat man during solidarity protest for Michael Brown in East Village; videoAugust 21, 2014
NYPD cops beat a man Wednesday night during a solidarity protest for Michael Brown, a video shows, although the circumstances surrounding the attack remained unclear early Thursday.
The 45-second video begins after police officers and the man have started arguing in the middle of a dark street in the East Village. It was not apparent what prompted officers to react so forcefully.
When asked for a comment on the video, police said the man was taken into custody on E. 10th St. near Ave. D, issued a C-summons for disorderly conduct and then released. They described his actions before the violent encounter as “tumultuous behavior.”
Demonstrators marched through the Lower East Side and in Union Square over the death of Brown, the unarmed black teen gunned down by a white cop in Ferguson, Mo., on Aug. 9. Brown’s killing followed the July 17 death of Eric Garner, 43, who was put in a chokehold by cops in Staten Island.
The Wednesday night video, taken from a BlackBerry and posted on Facebook, shows officers punching and tackling a man to the ground while protesters stand around shouting at the cops.
"Don’t shoot him! Don’t shoot him!" one woman yells as the melee begins.
"Yo, you knocked him out," another man shouts as a swarm of officers arrive at the scene.
A crowd of protesters surrounded the officers chanting “Hands up, don’t shoot,” which has become the motto for Brown protests around the country.
The clip ends with a group yelling, “Cops, pigs, murders,” at the responding officers.

Source NYPD cops beat man during solidarity protest for Michael Brown in East Village; videoAugust 21, 2014
NYPD cops beat a man Wednesday night during a solidarity protest for Michael Brown, a video shows, although the circumstances surrounding the attack remained unclear early Thursday.
The 45-second video begins after police officers and the man have started arguing in the middle of a dark street in the East Village. It was not apparent what prompted officers to react so forcefully.
When asked for a comment on the video, police said the man was taken into custody on E. 10th St. near Ave. D, issued a C-summons for disorderly conduct and then released. They described his actions before the violent encounter as “tumultuous behavior.”
Demonstrators marched through the Lower East Side and in Union Square over the death of Brown, the unarmed black teen gunned down by a white cop in Ferguson, Mo., on Aug. 9. Brown’s killing followed the July 17 death of Eric Garner, 43, who was put in a chokehold by cops in Staten Island.
The Wednesday night video, taken from a BlackBerry and posted on Facebook, shows officers punching and tackling a man to the ground while protesters stand around shouting at the cops.
"Don’t shoot him! Don’t shoot him!" one woman yells as the melee begins.
"Yo, you knocked him out," another man shouts as a swarm of officers arrive at the scene.
A crowd of protesters surrounded the officers chanting “Hands up, don’t shoot,” which has become the motto for Brown protests around the country.
The clip ends with a group yelling, “Cops, pigs, murders,” at the responding officers.

Source

NYPD cops beat man during solidarity protest for Michael Brown in East Village; video
August 21, 2014

NYPD cops beat a man Wednesday night during a solidarity protest for Michael Brown, a video shows, although the circumstances surrounding the attack remained unclear early Thursday.

The 45-second video begins after police officers and the man have started arguing in the middle of a dark street in the East Village. It was not apparent what prompted officers to react so forcefully.

When asked for a comment on the video, police said the man was taken into custody on E. 10th St. near Ave. D, issued a C-summons for disorderly conduct and then released. They described his actions before the violent encounter as “tumultuous behavior.”

Demonstrators marched through the Lower East Side and in Union Square over the death of Brown, the unarmed black teen gunned down by a white cop in Ferguson, Mo., on Aug. 9. Brown’s killing followed the July 17 death of Eric Garner, 43, who was put in a chokehold by cops in Staten Island.

The Wednesday night video, taken from a BlackBerry and posted on Facebook, shows officers punching and tackling a man to the ground while protesters stand around shouting at the cops.

"Don’t shoot him! Don’t shoot him!" one woman yells as the melee begins.

"Yo, you knocked him out," another man shouts as a swarm of officers arrive at the scene.

A crowd of protesters surrounded the officers chanting “Hands up, don’t shoot,” which has become the motto for Brown protests around the country.

The clip ends with a group yelling, “Cops, pigs, murders,” at the responding officers.

Source

america-wakiewakie:

"Hey Hey, Ho Ho, These Racist Cops Have Got to Go": Oakland, CA, marches in solidarity with Ferguson | AmericaWakieWakie 
August 20th, 2014
Tonight, just over a week after the killing of an unarmed black teen at the hands of Ferguson, MO police, Oakland residents took to the streets in solidarity with protesters across the country to demand an end to police brutality against black (and brown) communities. Centered around the failure of Ferguson’s local authorities to arrest killer cop Darren Wilson, the officer responsible for Michael Brown’s death, protesters in Oakland rallied to demand “Justice for Mike Brown.”
SF Gate reported:

The marches started in four separate locations - Frank H. Ogawa Plaza, Jack London Square, the main branch of the Oakland Public Library and the African American History Museum - but came together outside of Oakland Police Headquarters around 6 p.m.
Protesters from the different marches were briefly prevented from joining up with each other by a line of police.
Quanah Brightman, executive director of United Native Americans, an Indian protest group was angered by police attempting to block the marchers from uniting.
"They won’t even let us walk on the public street," he said. "I don’t feel safe. It is what it is, and they hate us. When they put on a badge, they’re allowed to kill us."
Several protesters and family members had recently returned from Ferguson, where police have been criticized for their heavy-handed tactics, and urged support for their counterparts there.

Oakland certainly is not unfamiliar with police brutality. Like today, it was not long ago that the community was in the streets over the death of Oscar Grant, who was killed by BART police in 2009. Or the nearby deaths of Alex Nieto and Andy Lopez, who both died at the hands of law enforcement officers.
Even more recently, however, over the death of Alan Blueford, who was shot and killed by Oakland police on May 6, 2012. His mother, Jeralynn Blueford, along with Grant’s mother, attended the protest tonight.
As quoted by SF Gate, she rallied the crowd with chants of “They say get back! We say, fight back,” as police formed a line to block merging groups of protesters.
She went on to tell the folks to take the fight to Washington D.C., saying “We’re going to change this crooked system. Obama, if you hear me, Alan Blueford’s life matters. Mike Brown's life matters.”
(Photo Credit: Top by Scott Strazzante | All remaining by AmericaWakieWakie)
america-wakiewakie:

"Hey Hey, Ho Ho, These Racist Cops Have Got to Go": Oakland, CA, marches in solidarity with Ferguson | AmericaWakieWakie 
August 20th, 2014
Tonight, just over a week after the killing of an unarmed black teen at the hands of Ferguson, MO police, Oakland residents took to the streets in solidarity with protesters across the country to demand an end to police brutality against black (and brown) communities. Centered around the failure of Ferguson’s local authorities to arrest killer cop Darren Wilson, the officer responsible for Michael Brown’s death, protesters in Oakland rallied to demand “Justice for Mike Brown.”
SF Gate reported:

The marches started in four separate locations - Frank H. Ogawa Plaza, Jack London Square, the main branch of the Oakland Public Library and the African American History Museum - but came together outside of Oakland Police Headquarters around 6 p.m.
Protesters from the different marches were briefly prevented from joining up with each other by a line of police.
Quanah Brightman, executive director of United Native Americans, an Indian protest group was angered by police attempting to block the marchers from uniting.
"They won’t even let us walk on the public street," he said. "I don’t feel safe. It is what it is, and they hate us. When they put on a badge, they’re allowed to kill us."
Several protesters and family members had recently returned from Ferguson, where police have been criticized for their heavy-handed tactics, and urged support for their counterparts there.

Oakland certainly is not unfamiliar with police brutality. Like today, it was not long ago that the community was in the streets over the death of Oscar Grant, who was killed by BART police in 2009. Or the nearby deaths of Alex Nieto and Andy Lopez, who both died at the hands of law enforcement officers.
Even more recently, however, over the death of Alan Blueford, who was shot and killed by Oakland police on May 6, 2012. His mother, Jeralynn Blueford, along with Grant’s mother, attended the protest tonight.
As quoted by SF Gate, she rallied the crowd with chants of “They say get back! We say, fight back,” as police formed a line to block merging groups of protesters.
She went on to tell the folks to take the fight to Washington D.C., saying “We’re going to change this crooked system. Obama, if you hear me, Alan Blueford’s life matters. Mike Brown's life matters.”
(Photo Credit: Top by Scott Strazzante | All remaining by AmericaWakieWakie)
america-wakiewakie:

"Hey Hey, Ho Ho, These Racist Cops Have Got to Go": Oakland, CA, marches in solidarity with Ferguson | AmericaWakieWakie 
August 20th, 2014
Tonight, just over a week after the killing of an unarmed black teen at the hands of Ferguson, MO police, Oakland residents took to the streets in solidarity with protesters across the country to demand an end to police brutality against black (and brown) communities. Centered around the failure of Ferguson’s local authorities to arrest killer cop Darren Wilson, the officer responsible for Michael Brown’s death, protesters in Oakland rallied to demand “Justice for Mike Brown.”
SF Gate reported:

The marches started in four separate locations - Frank H. Ogawa Plaza, Jack London Square, the main branch of the Oakland Public Library and the African American History Museum - but came together outside of Oakland Police Headquarters around 6 p.m.
Protesters from the different marches were briefly prevented from joining up with each other by a line of police.
Quanah Brightman, executive director of United Native Americans, an Indian protest group was angered by police attempting to block the marchers from uniting.
"They won’t even let us walk on the public street," he said. "I don’t feel safe. It is what it is, and they hate us. When they put on a badge, they’re allowed to kill us."
Several protesters and family members had recently returned from Ferguson, where police have been criticized for their heavy-handed tactics, and urged support for their counterparts there.

Oakland certainly is not unfamiliar with police brutality. Like today, it was not long ago that the community was in the streets over the death of Oscar Grant, who was killed by BART police in 2009. Or the nearby deaths of Alex Nieto and Andy Lopez, who both died at the hands of law enforcement officers.
Even more recently, however, over the death of Alan Blueford, who was shot and killed by Oakland police on May 6, 2012. His mother, Jeralynn Blueford, along with Grant’s mother, attended the protest tonight.
As quoted by SF Gate, she rallied the crowd with chants of “They say get back! We say, fight back,” as police formed a line to block merging groups of protesters.
She went on to tell the folks to take the fight to Washington D.C., saying “We’re going to change this crooked system. Obama, if you hear me, Alan Blueford’s life matters. Mike Brown's life matters.”
(Photo Credit: Top by Scott Strazzante | All remaining by AmericaWakieWakie)
america-wakiewakie:

"Hey Hey, Ho Ho, These Racist Cops Have Got to Go": Oakland, CA, marches in solidarity with Ferguson | AmericaWakieWakie 
August 20th, 2014
Tonight, just over a week after the killing of an unarmed black teen at the hands of Ferguson, MO police, Oakland residents took to the streets in solidarity with protesters across the country to demand an end to police brutality against black (and brown) communities. Centered around the failure of Ferguson’s local authorities to arrest killer cop Darren Wilson, the officer responsible for Michael Brown’s death, protesters in Oakland rallied to demand “Justice for Mike Brown.”
SF Gate reported:

The marches started in four separate locations - Frank H. Ogawa Plaza, Jack London Square, the main branch of the Oakland Public Library and the African American History Museum - but came together outside of Oakland Police Headquarters around 6 p.m.
Protesters from the different marches were briefly prevented from joining up with each other by a line of police.
Quanah Brightman, executive director of United Native Americans, an Indian protest group was angered by police attempting to block the marchers from uniting.
"They won’t even let us walk on the public street," he said. "I don’t feel safe. It is what it is, and they hate us. When they put on a badge, they’re allowed to kill us."
Several protesters and family members had recently returned from Ferguson, where police have been criticized for their heavy-handed tactics, and urged support for their counterparts there.

Oakland certainly is not unfamiliar with police brutality. Like today, it was not long ago that the community was in the streets over the death of Oscar Grant, who was killed by BART police in 2009. Or the nearby deaths of Alex Nieto and Andy Lopez, who both died at the hands of law enforcement officers.
Even more recently, however, over the death of Alan Blueford, who was shot and killed by Oakland police on May 6, 2012. His mother, Jeralynn Blueford, along with Grant’s mother, attended the protest tonight.
As quoted by SF Gate, she rallied the crowd with chants of “They say get back! We say, fight back,” as police formed a line to block merging groups of protesters.
She went on to tell the folks to take the fight to Washington D.C., saying “We’re going to change this crooked system. Obama, if you hear me, Alan Blueford’s life matters. Mike Brown's life matters.”
(Photo Credit: Top by Scott Strazzante | All remaining by AmericaWakieWakie)
america-wakiewakie:

"Hey Hey, Ho Ho, These Racist Cops Have Got to Go": Oakland, CA, marches in solidarity with Ferguson | AmericaWakieWakie 
August 20th, 2014
Tonight, just over a week after the killing of an unarmed black teen at the hands of Ferguson, MO police, Oakland residents took to the streets in solidarity with protesters across the country to demand an end to police brutality against black (and brown) communities. Centered around the failure of Ferguson’s local authorities to arrest killer cop Darren Wilson, the officer responsible for Michael Brown’s death, protesters in Oakland rallied to demand “Justice for Mike Brown.”
SF Gate reported:

The marches started in four separate locations - Frank H. Ogawa Plaza, Jack London Square, the main branch of the Oakland Public Library and the African American History Museum - but came together outside of Oakland Police Headquarters around 6 p.m.
Protesters from the different marches were briefly prevented from joining up with each other by a line of police.
Quanah Brightman, executive director of United Native Americans, an Indian protest group was angered by police attempting to block the marchers from uniting.
"They won’t even let us walk on the public street," he said. "I don’t feel safe. It is what it is, and they hate us. When they put on a badge, they’re allowed to kill us."
Several protesters and family members had recently returned from Ferguson, where police have been criticized for their heavy-handed tactics, and urged support for their counterparts there.

Oakland certainly is not unfamiliar with police brutality. Like today, it was not long ago that the community was in the streets over the death of Oscar Grant, who was killed by BART police in 2009. Or the nearby deaths of Alex Nieto and Andy Lopez, who both died at the hands of law enforcement officers.
Even more recently, however, over the death of Alan Blueford, who was shot and killed by Oakland police on May 6, 2012. His mother, Jeralynn Blueford, along with Grant’s mother, attended the protest tonight.
As quoted by SF Gate, she rallied the crowd with chants of “They say get back! We say, fight back,” as police formed a line to block merging groups of protesters.
She went on to tell the folks to take the fight to Washington D.C., saying “We’re going to change this crooked system. Obama, if you hear me, Alan Blueford’s life matters. Mike Brown's life matters.”
(Photo Credit: Top by Scott Strazzante | All remaining by AmericaWakieWakie)
america-wakiewakie:

"Hey Hey, Ho Ho, These Racist Cops Have Got to Go": Oakland, CA, marches in solidarity with Ferguson | AmericaWakieWakie 
August 20th, 2014
Tonight, just over a week after the killing of an unarmed black teen at the hands of Ferguson, MO police, Oakland residents took to the streets in solidarity with protesters across the country to demand an end to police brutality against black (and brown) communities. Centered around the failure of Ferguson’s local authorities to arrest killer cop Darren Wilson, the officer responsible for Michael Brown’s death, protesters in Oakland rallied to demand “Justice for Mike Brown.”
SF Gate reported:

The marches started in four separate locations - Frank H. Ogawa Plaza, Jack London Square, the main branch of the Oakland Public Library and the African American History Museum - but came together outside of Oakland Police Headquarters around 6 p.m.
Protesters from the different marches were briefly prevented from joining up with each other by a line of police.
Quanah Brightman, executive director of United Native Americans, an Indian protest group was angered by police attempting to block the marchers from uniting.
"They won’t even let us walk on the public street," he said. "I don’t feel safe. It is what it is, and they hate us. When they put on a badge, they’re allowed to kill us."
Several protesters and family members had recently returned from Ferguson, where police have been criticized for their heavy-handed tactics, and urged support for their counterparts there.

Oakland certainly is not unfamiliar with police brutality. Like today, it was not long ago that the community was in the streets over the death of Oscar Grant, who was killed by BART police in 2009. Or the nearby deaths of Alex Nieto and Andy Lopez, who both died at the hands of law enforcement officers.
Even more recently, however, over the death of Alan Blueford, who was shot and killed by Oakland police on May 6, 2012. His mother, Jeralynn Blueford, along with Grant’s mother, attended the protest tonight.
As quoted by SF Gate, she rallied the crowd with chants of “They say get back! We say, fight back,” as police formed a line to block merging groups of protesters.
She went on to tell the folks to take the fight to Washington D.C., saying “We’re going to change this crooked system. Obama, if you hear me, Alan Blueford’s life matters. Mike Brown's life matters.”
(Photo Credit: Top by Scott Strazzante | All remaining by AmericaWakieWakie)
america-wakiewakie:

"Hey Hey, Ho Ho, These Racist Cops Have Got to Go": Oakland, CA, marches in solidarity with Ferguson | AmericaWakieWakie 
August 20th, 2014
Tonight, just over a week after the killing of an unarmed black teen at the hands of Ferguson, MO police, Oakland residents took to the streets in solidarity with protesters across the country to demand an end to police brutality against black (and brown) communities. Centered around the failure of Ferguson’s local authorities to arrest killer cop Darren Wilson, the officer responsible for Michael Brown’s death, protesters in Oakland rallied to demand “Justice for Mike Brown.”
SF Gate reported:

The marches started in four separate locations - Frank H. Ogawa Plaza, Jack London Square, the main branch of the Oakland Public Library and the African American History Museum - but came together outside of Oakland Police Headquarters around 6 p.m.
Protesters from the different marches were briefly prevented from joining up with each other by a line of police.
Quanah Brightman, executive director of United Native Americans, an Indian protest group was angered by police attempting to block the marchers from uniting.
"They won’t even let us walk on the public street," he said. "I don’t feel safe. It is what it is, and they hate us. When they put on a badge, they’re allowed to kill us."
Several protesters and family members had recently returned from Ferguson, where police have been criticized for their heavy-handed tactics, and urged support for their counterparts there.

Oakland certainly is not unfamiliar with police brutality. Like today, it was not long ago that the community was in the streets over the death of Oscar Grant, who was killed by BART police in 2009. Or the nearby deaths of Alex Nieto and Andy Lopez, who both died at the hands of law enforcement officers.
Even more recently, however, over the death of Alan Blueford, who was shot and killed by Oakland police on May 6, 2012. His mother, Jeralynn Blueford, along with Grant’s mother, attended the protest tonight.
As quoted by SF Gate, she rallied the crowd with chants of “They say get back! We say, fight back,” as police formed a line to block merging groups of protesters.
She went on to tell the folks to take the fight to Washington D.C., saying “We’re going to change this crooked system. Obama, if you hear me, Alan Blueford’s life matters. Mike Brown's life matters.”
(Photo Credit: Top by Scott Strazzante | All remaining by AmericaWakieWakie)
america-wakiewakie:

"Hey Hey, Ho Ho, These Racist Cops Have Got to Go": Oakland, CA, marches in solidarity with Ferguson | AmericaWakieWakie 
August 20th, 2014
Tonight, just over a week after the killing of an unarmed black teen at the hands of Ferguson, MO police, Oakland residents took to the streets in solidarity with protesters across the country to demand an end to police brutality against black (and brown) communities. Centered around the failure of Ferguson’s local authorities to arrest killer cop Darren Wilson, the officer responsible for Michael Brown’s death, protesters in Oakland rallied to demand “Justice for Mike Brown.”
SF Gate reported:

The marches started in four separate locations - Frank H. Ogawa Plaza, Jack London Square, the main branch of the Oakland Public Library and the African American History Museum - but came together outside of Oakland Police Headquarters around 6 p.m.
Protesters from the different marches were briefly prevented from joining up with each other by a line of police.
Quanah Brightman, executive director of United Native Americans, an Indian protest group was angered by police attempting to block the marchers from uniting.
"They won’t even let us walk on the public street," he said. "I don’t feel safe. It is what it is, and they hate us. When they put on a badge, they’re allowed to kill us."
Several protesters and family members had recently returned from Ferguson, where police have been criticized for their heavy-handed tactics, and urged support for their counterparts there.

Oakland certainly is not unfamiliar with police brutality. Like today, it was not long ago that the community was in the streets over the death of Oscar Grant, who was killed by BART police in 2009. Or the nearby deaths of Alex Nieto and Andy Lopez, who both died at the hands of law enforcement officers.
Even more recently, however, over the death of Alan Blueford, who was shot and killed by Oakland police on May 6, 2012. His mother, Jeralynn Blueford, along with Grant’s mother, attended the protest tonight.
As quoted by SF Gate, she rallied the crowd with chants of “They say get back! We say, fight back,” as police formed a line to block merging groups of protesters.
She went on to tell the folks to take the fight to Washington D.C., saying “We’re going to change this crooked system. Obama, if you hear me, Alan Blueford’s life matters. Mike Brown's life matters.”
(Photo Credit: Top by Scott Strazzante | All remaining by AmericaWakieWakie)
america-wakiewakie:

"Hey Hey, Ho Ho, These Racist Cops Have Got to Go": Oakland, CA, marches in solidarity with Ferguson | AmericaWakieWakie 
August 20th, 2014
Tonight, just over a week after the killing of an unarmed black teen at the hands of Ferguson, MO police, Oakland residents took to the streets in solidarity with protesters across the country to demand an end to police brutality against black (and brown) communities. Centered around the failure of Ferguson’s local authorities to arrest killer cop Darren Wilson, the officer responsible for Michael Brown’s death, protesters in Oakland rallied to demand “Justice for Mike Brown.”
SF Gate reported:

The marches started in four separate locations - Frank H. Ogawa Plaza, Jack London Square, the main branch of the Oakland Public Library and the African American History Museum - but came together outside of Oakland Police Headquarters around 6 p.m.
Protesters from the different marches were briefly prevented from joining up with each other by a line of police.
Quanah Brightman, executive director of United Native Americans, an Indian protest group was angered by police attempting to block the marchers from uniting.
"They won’t even let us walk on the public street," he said. "I don’t feel safe. It is what it is, and they hate us. When they put on a badge, they’re allowed to kill us."
Several protesters and family members had recently returned from Ferguson, where police have been criticized for their heavy-handed tactics, and urged support for their counterparts there.

Oakland certainly is not unfamiliar with police brutality. Like today, it was not long ago that the community was in the streets over the death of Oscar Grant, who was killed by BART police in 2009. Or the nearby deaths of Alex Nieto and Andy Lopez, who both died at the hands of law enforcement officers.
Even more recently, however, over the death of Alan Blueford, who was shot and killed by Oakland police on May 6, 2012. His mother, Jeralynn Blueford, along with Grant’s mother, attended the protest tonight.
As quoted by SF Gate, she rallied the crowd with chants of “They say get back! We say, fight back,” as police formed a line to block merging groups of protesters.
She went on to tell the folks to take the fight to Washington D.C., saying “We’re going to change this crooked system. Obama, if you hear me, Alan Blueford’s life matters. Mike Brown's life matters.”
(Photo Credit: Top by Scott Strazzante | All remaining by AmericaWakieWakie)
america-wakiewakie:

"Hey Hey, Ho Ho, These Racist Cops Have Got to Go": Oakland, CA, marches in solidarity with Ferguson | AmericaWakieWakie 
August 20th, 2014
Tonight, just over a week after the killing of an unarmed black teen at the hands of Ferguson, MO police, Oakland residents took to the streets in solidarity with protesters across the country to demand an end to police brutality against black (and brown) communities. Centered around the failure of Ferguson’s local authorities to arrest killer cop Darren Wilson, the officer responsible for Michael Brown’s death, protesters in Oakland rallied to demand “Justice for Mike Brown.”
SF Gate reported:

The marches started in four separate locations - Frank H. Ogawa Plaza, Jack London Square, the main branch of the Oakland Public Library and the African American History Museum - but came together outside of Oakland Police Headquarters around 6 p.m.
Protesters from the different marches were briefly prevented from joining up with each other by a line of police.
Quanah Brightman, executive director of United Native Americans, an Indian protest group was angered by police attempting to block the marchers from uniting.
"They won’t even let us walk on the public street," he said. "I don’t feel safe. It is what it is, and they hate us. When they put on a badge, they’re allowed to kill us."
Several protesters and family members had recently returned from Ferguson, where police have been criticized for their heavy-handed tactics, and urged support for their counterparts there.

Oakland certainly is not unfamiliar with police brutality. Like today, it was not long ago that the community was in the streets over the death of Oscar Grant, who was killed by BART police in 2009. Or the nearby deaths of Alex Nieto and Andy Lopez, who both died at the hands of law enforcement officers.
Even more recently, however, over the death of Alan Blueford, who was shot and killed by Oakland police on May 6, 2012. His mother, Jeralynn Blueford, along with Grant’s mother, attended the protest tonight.
As quoted by SF Gate, she rallied the crowd with chants of “They say get back! We say, fight back,” as police formed a line to block merging groups of protesters.
She went on to tell the folks to take the fight to Washington D.C., saying “We’re going to change this crooked system. Obama, if you hear me, Alan Blueford’s life matters. Mike Brown's life matters.”
(Photo Credit: Top by Scott Strazzante | All remaining by AmericaWakieWakie)

america-wakiewakie:

"Hey Hey, Ho Ho, These Racist Cops Have Got to Go": Oakland, CA, marches in solidarity with Ferguson | AmericaWakieWakie 

August 20th, 2014

Tonight, just over a week after the killing of an unarmed black teen at the hands of Ferguson, MO police, Oakland residents took to the streets in solidarity with protesters across the country to demand an end to police brutality against black (and brown) communities. Centered around the failure of Ferguson’s local authorities to arrest killer cop Darren Wilson, the officer responsible for Michael Brown’s death, protesters in Oakland rallied to demand “Justice for Mike Brown.”

SF Gate reported:

The marches started in four separate locations - Frank H. Ogawa Plaza, Jack London Square, the main branch of the Oakland Public Library and the African American History Museum - but came together outside of Oakland Police Headquarters around 6 p.m.

Protesters from the different marches were briefly prevented from joining up with each other by a line of police.

Quanah Brightman, executive director of United Native Americans, an Indian protest group was angered by police attempting to block the marchers from uniting.

"They won’t even let us walk on the public street," he said. "I don’t feel safe. It is what it is, and they hate us. When they put on a badge, they’re allowed to kill us."

Several protesters and family members had recently returned from Ferguson, where police have been criticized for their heavy-handed tactics, and urged support for their counterparts there.

Oakland certainly is not unfamiliar with police brutality. Like today, it was not long ago that the community was in the streets over the death of Oscar Grant, who was killed by BART police in 2009. Or the nearby deaths of Alex Nieto and Andy Lopez, who both died at the hands of law enforcement officers.

Even more recently, however, over the death of Alan Blueford, who was shot and killed by Oakland police on May 6, 2012. His mother, Jeralynn Blueford, along with Grant’s mother, attended the protest tonight.

As quoted by SF Gate, she rallied the crowd with chants of “They say get back! We say, fight back,” as police formed a line to block merging groups of protesters.

She went on to tell the folks to take the fight to Washington D.C., saying “We’re going to change this crooked system. Obama, if you hear me, Alan Blueford’s life matters. Mike Brown's life matters.”

(Photo Credit: Top by Scott Strazzante | All remaining by AmericaWakieWakie)

(via america-wakiewakie)

redtemplo:

BUSTED! Gov. Running #Ferguson Twitter Psyop

GOD!

Thousands of bots on Twitter tweeting out the same racist, anti-Michael Brown tweets. This, at least, is detectable/provable. But rest assured, in addition to easily purchasable bots there are paid individuals representing both private and government interests who are paid to wear down your resolve, troll you, shift opinion, convolute conversations, etc. regarding private business interests, foreign interests like this Israel student union Facebook war room, but much more organized. 

Although I think engaging in meaningful conversations (when possible) is important, I think being vigilant for your own mental health is also important. You should feel good/guiltless about blocking people, turning off the anonymous ask function, and ignoring trolls who will never try to actually have meaningful dialogues because often their whole agenda is simply to wear you down. -Robert

(via midgardmarxist)

Wacktivist devil: Ban breastfeeding in public, because it promotes ‘gay pride’August 19, 2014
A conservative activist in Ohio is attempting to ban female toplessness including breastfeeding, because it promotes “gay pride”.
Patrick Johnson, director of anti-abortion group Personhood Ohio, is urging for people to contact state lawmakers to call for a blanket ban on female nudity.
His church group, which frequently protests against strip clubs, was recently confronted with bad-ass counter-protesters in favor of the women’s right to choose what work they did.
He told ABC: “I think when we allow women to flaunt their sexuality to the public, flaunt their nudity to the public, it’s harmful to marriage.
“I am sick that women can legally bare their breasts to children and to married men against their will in Ohio.
“What they did was an offense to God, was an offense to the public morality, and the legislature should act to criminalize what they did.”
He added on Facebook: “The gay pride parade in Columbus is 500,000 strong – why? Because the women go topless. This is the only one where I’ve seen this level of nudity.
“[In] San Francisco, Chicago, Washington, D.C, I have never seen the kind of public lewdness I have seen in Columbus, Ohio.”
“Please call or Email your state senator and state reps to urge them to ban public nudity.
The Aiken Area Progressive blog warns: “This is a no-exceptions ban that if enacted, will drop the number of states to 49 in which breastfeeding is legal, and, if enacted, this definitely will violate numerous Constitutional amendments.”
Source
An exemplary example of evil, internalized patriarchy. He actually thinks women’s breastfeeding is about assaulting him and other ‘innocent married men’. 
Personhood Ohio contact. 

Wacktivist devil: Ban breastfeeding in public, because it promotes ‘gay pride’
August 19, 2014

A conservative activist in Ohio is attempting to ban female toplessness including breastfeeding, because it promotes “gay pride”.

Patrick Johnson, director of anti-abortion group Personhood Ohio, is urging for people to contact state lawmakers to call for a blanket ban on female nudity.

His church group, which frequently protests against strip clubs, was recently confronted with bad-ass counter-protesters in favor of the women’s right to choose what work they did.

He told ABC: “I think when we allow women to flaunt their sexuality to the public, flaunt their nudity to the public, it’s harmful to marriage.

“I am sick that women can legally bare their breasts to children and to married men against their will in Ohio.

“What they did was an offense to God, was an offense to the public morality, and the legislature should act to criminalize what they did.”

He added on Facebook: “The gay pride parade in Columbus is 500,000 strong – why? Because the women go topless. This is the only one where I’ve seen this level of nudity.

“[In] San Francisco, Chicago, Washington, D.C, I have never seen the kind of public lewdness I have seen in Columbus, Ohio.”

“Please call or Email your state senator and state reps to urge them to ban public nudity.

The Aiken Area Progressive blog warns: “This is a no-exceptions ban that if enacted, will drop the number of states to 49 in which breastfeeding is legal, and, if enacted, this definitely will violate numerous Constitutional amendments.”

Source

An exemplary example of evil, internalized patriarchy. He actually thinks women’s breastfeeding is about assaulting him and other ‘innocent married men’. 

Personhood Ohio contact

anarcho-queer:

Breaking News: Man Shot Dead In Officer Involved Shooting 4 Miles From Ferguson

August 19th, 2014

One man is dead after an officer-involved shooting in north St. Louis.

The shooting happened near Riverview Boulevard and McLaran Avenue. St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson says the suspect pulled a knife on a 6th District officer. No police officers were injured.

The suspect was pronounced dead at the scene, which is located approximately four miles from the unrest in Ferguson.

The man was heard saying “Shoot me now. Kill me now.”

One of the witnesses described it as a suicide by cop,” Police Chief Sam Dotson told reporters.

Over a hundred people are currently gathering at the scene of the crime according to NBC News.

Take action now: demand safer housing for trans people in New York state prisonsAugust 19, 2014
On August 7, 2014, Solitary Watch published two articles highlighting the abusive treatment faced by transgender women in New York State’s men’s prisons.  Two of the women profiled, Dee Dee and Carey, are members of the Sylvia Rivera Law Project (SRLP). SRLP works with transgender, gender nonconforming and intersex people who are low-income and/or people of color. SRLP’s Prisoner Justice Project has been advocating for transgender people in New York’s jails and prisons for over ten years.
While we were not surprised to read the horrors outlined in the Solitary Watch articles, we hope the publicity will bring attention to our work to abolish the prison system in the long-run and provide immediate safety measures to reduce the harm faced by those presently incarcerated. On August 11, 2014, SRLP, the Trans Women of Color Collective of Greater New York, the National Center for Transgender Equality and the Prisoners’ Legal Services of New York sent a letter to the New York Department of Corrections and Community Supervision demanding swift action to end the routine practice of isolating incarcerated transgender people. Now we are calling on our community members to take action by reading and signing this petition published by SRLP, FIERCE and the Audre Lorde Project! 
SRLP and Solitary Watch will continue to share stories of our incarcerated community members who are seeking external support. Please show your love and care by continuing to read the stories posted by Solitary Watch and SRLP. Our newest profile is that of Synthia China Blast. Watch the video of Laverne Cox reading a personal letter from Synthia as she discusses the importance of external support from community and family during her incarceration. The video premiered on BuzzFeed on August 19, 2014.
Read more of Synthia’s story Take action now: demand safer housing for trans people in New York state prisonsAugust 19, 2014
On August 7, 2014, Solitary Watch published two articles highlighting the abusive treatment faced by transgender women in New York State’s men’s prisons.  Two of the women profiled, Dee Dee and Carey, are members of the Sylvia Rivera Law Project (SRLP). SRLP works with transgender, gender nonconforming and intersex people who are low-income and/or people of color. SRLP’s Prisoner Justice Project has been advocating for transgender people in New York’s jails and prisons for over ten years.
While we were not surprised to read the horrors outlined in the Solitary Watch articles, we hope the publicity will bring attention to our work to abolish the prison system in the long-run and provide immediate safety measures to reduce the harm faced by those presently incarcerated. On August 11, 2014, SRLP, the Trans Women of Color Collective of Greater New York, the National Center for Transgender Equality and the Prisoners’ Legal Services of New York sent a letter to the New York Department of Corrections and Community Supervision demanding swift action to end the routine practice of isolating incarcerated transgender people. Now we are calling on our community members to take action by reading and signing this petition published by SRLP, FIERCE and the Audre Lorde Project! 
SRLP and Solitary Watch will continue to share stories of our incarcerated community members who are seeking external support. Please show your love and care by continuing to read the stories posted by Solitary Watch and SRLP. Our newest profile is that of Synthia China Blast. Watch the video of Laverne Cox reading a personal letter from Synthia as she discusses the importance of external support from community and family during her incarceration. The video premiered on BuzzFeed on August 19, 2014.
Read more of Synthia’s story

Take action now: demand safer housing for trans people in New York state prisons
August 19, 2014

On August 7, 2014, Solitary Watch published two articles highlighting the abusive treatment faced by transgender women in New York State’s men’s prisons.  Two of the women profiled, Dee Dee and Carey, are members of the Sylvia Rivera Law Project (SRLP). SRLP works with transgender, gender nonconforming and intersex people who are low-income and/or people of color. SRLP’s Prisoner Justice Project has been advocating for transgender people in New York’s jails and prisons for over ten years.

While we were not surprised to read the horrors outlined in the Solitary Watch articles, we hope the publicity will bring attention to our work to abolish the prison system in the long-run and provide immediate safety measures to reduce the harm faced by those presently incarcerated. On August 11, 2014, SRLP, the Trans Women of Color Collective of Greater New York, the National Center for Transgender Equality and the Prisoners’ Legal Services of New York sent a letter to the New York Department of Corrections and Community Supervision demanding swift action to end the routine practice of isolating incarcerated transgender people. Now we are calling on our community members to take action by reading and signing this petition published by SRLP, FIERCE and the Audre Lorde Project! 

SRLP and Solitary Watch will continue to share stories of our incarcerated community members who are seeking external support. Please show your love and care by continuing to read the stories posted by Solitary Watch and SRLP. Our newest profile is that of Synthia China Blast. Watch the video of Laverne Cox reading a personal letter from Synthia as she discusses the importance of external support from community and family during her incarceration. The video premiered on BuzzFeed on August 19, 2014.

Read more of Synthia’s story

Israel blocks Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch from GazaAugust 19, 2014
The Israeli government is blocking Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch from entering the Gaza Strip, preventing researchers from investigating the assault. The Israeli journalist Amira Hass reports the groups have been told they must register as a humanitarian aid organization, only to later be informed they do not qualify. Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch have previously issued reports that raised allegations of potential war crimes by Israel, as well as on a smaller scale by Hamas.
Source Israel blocks Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch from GazaAugust 19, 2014
The Israeli government is blocking Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch from entering the Gaza Strip, preventing researchers from investigating the assault. The Israeli journalist Amira Hass reports the groups have been told they must register as a humanitarian aid organization, only to later be informed they do not qualify. Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch have previously issued reports that raised allegations of potential war crimes by Israel, as well as on a smaller scale by Hamas.
Source Israel blocks Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch from GazaAugust 19, 2014
The Israeli government is blocking Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch from entering the Gaza Strip, preventing researchers from investigating the assault. The Israeli journalist Amira Hass reports the groups have been told they must register as a humanitarian aid organization, only to later be informed they do not qualify. Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch have previously issued reports that raised allegations of potential war crimes by Israel, as well as on a smaller scale by Hamas.
Source

Israel blocks Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch from Gaza
August 19, 2014

The Israeli government is blocking Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch from entering the Gaza Strip, preventing researchers from investigating the assault. The Israeli journalist Amira Hass reports the groups have been told they must register as a humanitarian aid organization, only to later be informed they do not qualify. Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch have previously issued reports that raised allegations of potential war crimes by Israel, as well as on a smaller scale by Hamas.

Source

Q

queeriesandmore asked:

I was wondering if I could get your opinion on the fact that protestors and demonstrators in Ferguson are now required to be walking rather than standing. It doesn't seem quite right with me but I can't place why.

A

Well it definitely doesn’t sit right with me. It’s another excuse to arrest protesters, another tactic for police to prevent demonstrating against police murder, another deterrent for people to protest. Do you know what the justification is? Whatever it is, the goal is pretty naked: put down the protests. It’s another stupid play from their wack-as-fuck playbook. -Robert

7 black women to follow for updates in #FergusonAugust 18, 2014
Like much of the world, I haven’t been able to take my eyes off of the unrest that’s happening in Ferguson, Missouri. Social media has, once again, proven it’s effectiveness in quickly disseminating information and fact-checking mainstream sources for an event that the history books will not forgot. While you’re trying to keep up with what’s going on, be sure to follow these women who are doing extraordinary work telling stories and keeping those of us who cannot make it to Ferguson abreast of what’s happening on the ground.

1)      Brittany Noble | Reporter for KMOV in St. Louis | Twitter/Instagram
2)      Yamiche Alcindor | Contributor for MSNBC and USA Today | Twitter/Vine/Website
3)      Maria Chappelle-Nadal | Missouri State Senator | Twitter
4)      Patricia Bynes | Democratic committeewoman of Ferguson Township | Twitter
5)      Tasha B. | Resident & activist | Twitter/Instagram
6)      @Awkward_Duck | Resident & activist | Twitter
7)      Johnetta E. | Resident & activist | Twitter

Source 7 black women to follow for updates in #FergusonAugust 18, 2014
Like much of the world, I haven’t been able to take my eyes off of the unrest that’s happening in Ferguson, Missouri. Social media has, once again, proven it’s effectiveness in quickly disseminating information and fact-checking mainstream sources for an event that the history books will not forgot. While you’re trying to keep up with what’s going on, be sure to follow these women who are doing extraordinary work telling stories and keeping those of us who cannot make it to Ferguson abreast of what’s happening on the ground.

1)      Brittany Noble | Reporter for KMOV in St. Louis | Twitter/Instagram
2)      Yamiche Alcindor | Contributor for MSNBC and USA Today | Twitter/Vine/Website
3)      Maria Chappelle-Nadal | Missouri State Senator | Twitter
4)      Patricia Bynes | Democratic committeewoman of Ferguson Township | Twitter
5)      Tasha B. | Resident & activist | Twitter/Instagram
6)      @Awkward_Duck | Resident & activist | Twitter
7)      Johnetta E. | Resident & activist | Twitter

Source 7 black women to follow for updates in #FergusonAugust 18, 2014
Like much of the world, I haven’t been able to take my eyes off of the unrest that’s happening in Ferguson, Missouri. Social media has, once again, proven it’s effectiveness in quickly disseminating information and fact-checking mainstream sources for an event that the history books will not forgot. While you’re trying to keep up with what’s going on, be sure to follow these women who are doing extraordinary work telling stories and keeping those of us who cannot make it to Ferguson abreast of what’s happening on the ground.

1)      Brittany Noble | Reporter for KMOV in St. Louis | Twitter/Instagram
2)      Yamiche Alcindor | Contributor for MSNBC and USA Today | Twitter/Vine/Website
3)      Maria Chappelle-Nadal | Missouri State Senator | Twitter
4)      Patricia Bynes | Democratic committeewoman of Ferguson Township | Twitter
5)      Tasha B. | Resident & activist | Twitter/Instagram
6)      @Awkward_Duck | Resident & activist | Twitter
7)      Johnetta E. | Resident & activist | Twitter

Source 7 black women to follow for updates in #FergusonAugust 18, 2014
Like much of the world, I haven’t been able to take my eyes off of the unrest that’s happening in Ferguson, Missouri. Social media has, once again, proven it’s effectiveness in quickly disseminating information and fact-checking mainstream sources for an event that the history books will not forgot. While you’re trying to keep up with what’s going on, be sure to follow these women who are doing extraordinary work telling stories and keeping those of us who cannot make it to Ferguson abreast of what’s happening on the ground.

1)      Brittany Noble | Reporter for KMOV in St. Louis | Twitter/Instagram
2)      Yamiche Alcindor | Contributor for MSNBC and USA Today | Twitter/Vine/Website
3)      Maria Chappelle-Nadal | Missouri State Senator | Twitter
4)      Patricia Bynes | Democratic committeewoman of Ferguson Township | Twitter
5)      Tasha B. | Resident & activist | Twitter/Instagram
6)      @Awkward_Duck | Resident & activist | Twitter
7)      Johnetta E. | Resident & activist | Twitter

Source 7 black women to follow for updates in #FergusonAugust 18, 2014
Like much of the world, I haven’t been able to take my eyes off of the unrest that’s happening in Ferguson, Missouri. Social media has, once again, proven it’s effectiveness in quickly disseminating information and fact-checking mainstream sources for an event that the history books will not forgot. While you’re trying to keep up with what’s going on, be sure to follow these women who are doing extraordinary work telling stories and keeping those of us who cannot make it to Ferguson abreast of what’s happening on the ground.

1)      Brittany Noble | Reporter for KMOV in St. Louis | Twitter/Instagram
2)      Yamiche Alcindor | Contributor for MSNBC and USA Today | Twitter/Vine/Website
3)      Maria Chappelle-Nadal | Missouri State Senator | Twitter
4)      Patricia Bynes | Democratic committeewoman of Ferguson Township | Twitter
5)      Tasha B. | Resident & activist | Twitter/Instagram
6)      @Awkward_Duck | Resident & activist | Twitter
7)      Johnetta E. | Resident & activist | Twitter

Source 7 black women to follow for updates in #FergusonAugust 18, 2014
Like much of the world, I haven’t been able to take my eyes off of the unrest that’s happening in Ferguson, Missouri. Social media has, once again, proven it’s effectiveness in quickly disseminating information and fact-checking mainstream sources for an event that the history books will not forgot. While you’re trying to keep up with what’s going on, be sure to follow these women who are doing extraordinary work telling stories and keeping those of us who cannot make it to Ferguson abreast of what’s happening on the ground.

1)      Brittany Noble | Reporter for KMOV in St. Louis | Twitter/Instagram
2)      Yamiche Alcindor | Contributor for MSNBC and USA Today | Twitter/Vine/Website
3)      Maria Chappelle-Nadal | Missouri State Senator | Twitter
4)      Patricia Bynes | Democratic committeewoman of Ferguson Township | Twitter
5)      Tasha B. | Resident & activist | Twitter/Instagram
6)      @Awkward_Duck | Resident & activist | Twitter
7)      Johnetta E. | Resident & activist | Twitter

Source 7 black women to follow for updates in #FergusonAugust 18, 2014
Like much of the world, I haven’t been able to take my eyes off of the unrest that’s happening in Ferguson, Missouri. Social media has, once again, proven it’s effectiveness in quickly disseminating information and fact-checking mainstream sources for an event that the history books will not forgot. While you’re trying to keep up with what’s going on, be sure to follow these women who are doing extraordinary work telling stories and keeping those of us who cannot make it to Ferguson abreast of what’s happening on the ground.

1)      Brittany Noble | Reporter for KMOV in St. Louis | Twitter/Instagram
2)      Yamiche Alcindor | Contributor for MSNBC and USA Today | Twitter/Vine/Website
3)      Maria Chappelle-Nadal | Missouri State Senator | Twitter
4)      Patricia Bynes | Democratic committeewoman of Ferguson Township | Twitter
5)      Tasha B. | Resident & activist | Twitter/Instagram
6)      @Awkward_Duck | Resident & activist | Twitter
7)      Johnetta E. | Resident & activist | Twitter

Source 7 black women to follow for updates in #FergusonAugust 18, 2014
Like much of the world, I haven’t been able to take my eyes off of the unrest that’s happening in Ferguson, Missouri. Social media has, once again, proven it’s effectiveness in quickly disseminating information and fact-checking mainstream sources for an event that the history books will not forgot. While you’re trying to keep up with what’s going on, be sure to follow these women who are doing extraordinary work telling stories and keeping those of us who cannot make it to Ferguson abreast of what’s happening on the ground.

1)      Brittany Noble | Reporter for KMOV in St. Louis | Twitter/Instagram
2)      Yamiche Alcindor | Contributor for MSNBC and USA Today | Twitter/Vine/Website
3)      Maria Chappelle-Nadal | Missouri State Senator | Twitter
4)      Patricia Bynes | Democratic committeewoman of Ferguson Township | Twitter
5)      Tasha B. | Resident & activist | Twitter/Instagram
6)      @Awkward_Duck | Resident & activist | Twitter
7)      Johnetta E. | Resident & activist | Twitter

Source

7 black women to follow for updates in #Ferguson
August 18, 2014

Like much of the world, I haven’t been able to take my eyes off of the unrest that’s happening in Ferguson, Missouri. Social media has, once again, proven it’s effectiveness in quickly disseminating information and fact-checking mainstream sources for an event that the history books will not forgot. While you’re trying to keep up with what’s going on, be sure to follow these women who are doing extraordinary work telling stories and keeping those of us who cannot make it to Ferguson abreast of what’s happening on the ground.

1)      Brittany Noble | Reporter for KMOV in St. Louis | Twitter/Instagram

2)      Yamiche Alcindor | Contributor for MSNBC and USA Today | Twitter/Vine/Website

3)      Maria Chappelle-Nadal | Missouri State Senator | Twitter

4)      Patricia Bynes | Democratic committeewoman of Ferguson Township | Twitter

5)      Tasha B. | Resident & activist | Twitter/Instagram

6)      @Awkward_Duck | Resident & activist | Twitter

7)      Johnetta E. | Resident & activist | Twitter

Source

sonofbaldwin:

Whenever the police murder someone, they try to concoct a story, however implausible, that implicates the victim or the victim’s loved ones as the cause of the shooting.

Cops will routinely use the They Tried to Grab My Gun! contrivance, along with They Made a Sudden Move and They Made Furtive Movements.

For the murder of Aiyana Stanley-Jones, they used the first excuse.

It worked.

The jury couldn’t convict. Even though the charge, itself, was a tap on the wrist.

And no one marched. And no one rioted. And our outrage was contained before it eventually dissipated.

Because so few of us even know her name.

Because no one marches or riots for black girls.

Because most people thought like the person who examined Aiyana’s lifeless body:

"You might say that the homicide of Aiyana is the natural conclusion to the disease from which she suffered," Schmidt told me.

"What disease was that?" I asked.

"The psychopathology of growing up in Detroit," he said. "Some people are doomed from birth because their environment is so toxic."

So America’s feeling is that the cop should be absolved because the real murderer is black pathology. Whiteness is always innocent and Blackness is always guilty.

FOH.

The title of this article should be WHO Killed Aiyana Stanley-Jones—or better yet: We KNOW WHO Killed Aiyana Stanley-Jones.

But the truth dies first.

That’s how shit works in ‘Murrica.